Oklahoma Law Enforcement Memorial

Michael Bruce Keen - Officer

Muldrow Police Department


Shortly after 11 p.m. on Wednesday, June 23, 1982, Officer Michael Keen and his partner Officer Donald Wayne Edwards set up a roadblock on SH – 64-B in Muldrow in an attempt to stop a stolen Chevrolet Camaro being pursued by officers from Roland, Sallisaw and the Sequoyah County Sheriff’s Office. The stolen Camaro did not slow for the roadblock and got around it as the two Muldrow officers fired shots at it. The stolen Camaro was being followed closely by Sallisaw Officer Steven L. Boy. Officer Steven Boy attempted to avoid the Muldrow Police unit and struck Officer Michael Keen knocking him into Officer Donald Edwards and against a guardrail. Officer Michael Keen was pronounced dead at the scene dying less than an hour before his thirty-third birthday.


Officers Wayne Edwards and Steven Boy were both treated at a local hospital.


Officer Michael Keen was survived by his wife and two children and is buried in Liberty Cemetery, Roland, Sequoyah County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 2N-1-23                      NLEOM – 45W17


March 4, 2021





A. Lincoln Keeney - Deputy U.S. Marshal


U.S. Marshal


Shortly after 11 p.m. on Wednesday, June 23, 1982, Officer Michael Keen and his partner Officer Donald Wayne Edwards set up a roadblock on SH – 64-B in Muldrow in an attempt to stop a stolen Chevrolet Camaro being pursued by officers from Roland, Sallisaw and the Sequoyah County Sheriff’s Office. The stolen Camaro did not slow for the roadblock and got around it as the two Muldrow officers fired shots at it. The stolen Camaro was being followed closely by Sallisaw Officer Steven L. Boy. Officer Steven Boy attempted to avoid the Muldrow Police unit and struck Officer Michael Keen knocking him into Officer Donald Edwards and against a guardrail. Officer Michael Keen was pronounced dead at the scene dying less than an hour before his thirty-third birthday.


Officers Wayne Edwards and Steven Boy were both treated at a local hospital.


Officer Michael Keen was survived by his wife and two children and is buried in Liberty Cemetery, Roland, Sequoyah County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 2N-1-23                      NLEOM – 45W17


March 4, 2021



James Daniel  "Jim"  Keirsey - Officer


Seminole Police Department


About 8 p.m. the evening of Thursday, November 7, 1929, Officer James Keirsey was one of four officers who surrounded the home of Sam and Ruth Dyer in Harjo where a group of bank robbers were suspected to be hiding out. Officer James Keirsey and State Crime Bureau Agent Claude Tyler covered the back door, Seminole Police Chief Jake Sims going to the front door and Seminole County Deputy Sheriff George Hall covered the side of the house.


Chief Jake Sims was met at the front door by Owen Edwards and the two men started firing their guns at each other. Owen Edwards, wounded in one shoulder, then ran for the back door. Agent Claude Tyler had taken Sam and Ruth Dyer into custody and Officer James Keirsey had stepped in the back door with his gun drawn. When Owen Edwards saw Officer James Keirsey, he opened fire on him with his two .45 caliber automatic pistols, hitting Officer James Keirsey numerous times, killing him. Officer James Keirsey was able to return two shots before dying. Chief Jake Sims and Agent Claude Tyler then shot and killed Owen Edwards.


Officer James Keirsey, 41, was survived by his wife and three children and is buried in Highland Cemetery, Durant, Bryan County, Oklahoma.


A year later Officer James Keirsey’s brother, William Con Keirsey, would also die in the line of duty as a law enforcement officer.


OLEM – 8S-4-9    NLEOM – 36W18


March 5, 2021




William Conway "Con" Keirsey - Deputy Sheriff


Carter County Sheriff's Office


About 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, December 10, 1930, Deputy Sheriff William “Con” Keirsey, 34, and Undersheriff Vernon D. Cason went to Wirt to check on a stolen car. The officers soon located the car in front of a three-room shack. There were two apartments. As Undersheriff Vernon Cason entered one apartment, Deputy Sheriff “Con” Keirsey was admitted into the other apartment by an elderly woman.  Deputy Sheriff “Con” Keirsey observed several women and children and one man in the room. When Deputy Sheriff “Con” Keirsey asked about the car out front, a second man, that Keirsey had not seen laying under some covers on a bed in the corner of the room, rose holding two guns on the deputy sheriff. The first man then drew a gun also. Undersheriff Vernon Cason then entered the room and was shot in the abdomen by one of the men, Colquitt Davis, 19. Undersheriff Vernon Cason returned fire hitting the other man, D. I. Davis, 21, twice. Deputy Sheriff “Con” Keirsey then jumped on the already-wounded D. I. Davis. During the struggle, Deputy Sheriff William “Con” Keirsey was shot in the chin. The bullet ranged downward, severing his windpipe, and passing through his left lung before lodging in his back. The Davis brothers then fired two more shots at the fallen Undersheriff Vernon Cason, but the shots only grazed his neck. The Davis brothers then left in Deputy Sheriff “Con” Keirsey’s county car.


Undersheriff Vernon Cason survived his wounds, but Deputy Sheriff William “Con “Keirsey died the next morning, December 11th.


Deputy Sheriff William “Con” Keirsey was survived by his wife Vella and their six children and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, Ardmore, Carter County, Oklahoma on December 12th.


That same day D. I. Davis was killed in a shootout with police officers in Wichita, Kansas.


Colquitt Davis was arrested two days later in Hereford, Texas. He was found guilty of Deputy Sheriff William “Con” Keirsey’s murder and sentenced to life in prison.


Deputy Sheriff William “Con” Keirsey’s older brother James Keirsey died in the line of duty the year before.


OLEM – 8S-4-10    NLEOM – 63E19


March 5, 2021




William Haskell Keith - Officer


Del City Police Department


At 10:53 p.m. on Tuesday, January 12, 1965, Sergeant John Dickinson, 42, and his rookie partner Officer William Keith, 26, became involved in a high-speed vehicle pursuit south on Sunnylane Road in Del City. During the pursuit Sergeant John Dickinson had fired several gunshots at the fleeing vehicle with his revolver and shotgun while Officer William Keith drove. The pursuit continued south on Sunnylane Road into Oklahoma City. Near Southeast 74th Street the police car went out of control, hit a telephone pole at an estimated eighty miles per hour and rolled over into a ditch injuring both officers. The speeding vehicle being pursued kept going.


Harry Kenneth Turoczi, 19, was arrested the next day and charged with eluding police and several other charges.


Officer William Keith died of his injuries a week later at 1:20 a.m. on Tuesday, January 19, his thirty-third day as a police officer.


Officer William Keith was survived by his wife Carolyn and their three young children and is buried in Resthaven Gardens Cemetery, Oklahoma City, Cleveland County, Oklahoma.


Sergeant John Dickinson survived his injuries.


OLEM – 7N-4-18    NLEOM – 51W12


March 5, 2021



Ernest H. Keller -  Chief


Drumright Police Department


About 10:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 10, 1916, Chief Ernest Keller, 35, and Deputy Jim Rippey were investigating the robbery of two employees of the Prairie Oil and Gas Company, near the slaughterhouse. The two officers started walking down the Santa Fe Railroad tracks. After going only about fifty feet the officers encountered two men walking toward them. Chief Ernest Keller called out to the men to stop when one of them drew a pistol, shooting Chief Ernest Keller fatally. Deputy Rippey emptied his gun at the men as they ran away.


After Deputy Rippey determined that Chief Ernest Keller was dead he went after the two men with a rifle he borrowed from a nearby house. Deputy Rippey caught one man after wounding him. The second man was arrested at his home near the scene.


It soon came to light that the whole affair was a tragic mistake. The wounded man, J. W. Miller, and the other man, R. C. Aubrey were employed by the same company as the robbery victims who had told them of their robbery. When the two officers approached them on the tracks in the dark and Chief Ernest Keller called out for them to stop, they assumed they were the robbers and opened fire on them.  J. W. Miller survived his wounds.


Chief Ernest Keller was survived by his wife Ida and is buried in Oaklawn Cemetery, Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 3S-2-12    NLEOM – 48W27


March 7, 2021



Ervin A. "Erv" Kelley - Special Agent


Oklahoma Bankers Association


In January of 1932, Ervin Kelley retired after serving six years as Sheriff of McIntosh County. Ervin Kelley was then hired as a Special Agent by the Oklahoma Bankers Association for the express purpose of hunting down and arresting bank robber Charles Arthur “Pretty Boy” Floyd. The bankers presented Ervin Kelley with a new Thompson submachine gun. Special Agent Ervin Kelley began a three-month investigation that led him to Charles Floyd’s wife, Ruby in Tulsa. Special Agent Ervin Kelley placed Mrs. Charles Floyd under surveillance. On Friday, April 8, 1932, Ruby Floyd drove to her father’s farm, three miles west and three quarters of a mile south of Bixby in Tulsa County, to meet her outlaw husband. Special Agent Ervin Kelley and an eight-man posse that included State Crime Bureau Agent Crockett Long quietly surrounded the farm. Special Agent Ervin Kelley was concealed near the front of the house with his submachine gun with a twenty-one-round clip, a silencer, and a .38 caliber pistol. At 2:25 a.m. on the morning of Saturday, April 9, a green Chevrolet occupied by Charles Floyd and his partner George Birdwell drove up to the farm. The other officers soon heard several pistol shots and saw the green Chevrolet drive off. When the officers checked they found Special Agent Ervin Kelley dead. He had been wounded five times with a .45 caliber gun, once under his right arm, twice in the left side and in both knees. Special Agent Ervin Kelley had fired a fourteen-round burst from his submachine gun as he fell wounding Charles “Pretty Boy” Floyd in his right leg and left ankle. The silencer on the machine gun prevented his possemen from hearing the shots and delayed their response.


Special Agent Ervin Kelley was survived by his wife Dessa, three sons and two daughters and is buried in Greenlawn Cemetery, Checotah, McIntosh County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 8S-5-10   NLEOM –


April 7, 2021





William Kelly - Posse, Deputy U.S. Marshal


U.S. Marshal


On Monday, January 17, 1887, four lawmen, Deputy U.S. Marshal John Phillips and his three posse, Henry Smith, Mark Kuykendall and William Kelly, arrested Seaborn Green (also known as Kalijah) an eighteen-year-old Creek Indian who was wanted on a federal warrant for selling whiskey in the Indian Territory. After the arrest, the lawmen established a campsite near Hillabee (twenty miles northwest of Eufaula near present Stidham), I.T. Deputy Marshal John Phillips left his three posse in charge of Seaborn Green while he returned to Eufaula on business.


The three posse agreed to take turns watching the prisoner during the night. William Kelly drew the first watch. Sometime during the night, either Pose William Kelly fell asleep or was surprised by Seaborn Green who had obtained the camp axe. Posse William Kelly was struck in the neck by the axe, with his head almost severed. Seaborn Green then used the axe on Posse Mark Kuykendall and Posse Henry Smith striking them both in the head killing them. Seaborn Green then piled logs around the bodies and set fire to the bed clothing and logs to burn the bodies.


The following day Deputy Marshal John Phillips returned to the gruesome site at the camp. His entire posse was dead, and Seaborn Green was gone. Deputy Marshal John Phillips discovered that all weapons had been taken from the camp. Deputy Marshal John Phillips buried his fellow lawmen near the campsite and then went in search of Seaborn Green.


For the next eleven days Deputy Marshal John Phillips looked for Seaborn Green. Deputy Marshal Phillips finally located and arrested Seaborn Green on January 28th. Seaborn Green tried to claim it was an unknown person who had entered the camp and killed the three posse. At his trial held in Fort Smith on July 13, 1887, Seaborn Green was found guilty of three counts of murder after he admitted he had committed all three murders alone. Seaborn Green was sentenced to death by hanging and the sentence was carried out on October 7, 1887, when he was hung on the courthouse property.


The exact burial site of Posse William Kelly, Mark Kuykendall, and Henry Smith, near present day Stidham is unknown.

 

William Kelly was survived by his wife to whom he had been married only a short time.


OLEM – 4S-1-6    NLEOM – 15E17


January 17, 2021




John Henry Kerr - Officer


Picher Police Department


The evening of Wednesday, March 11, 1987, Officer John Kerr and his partner, Reserve Officer Greg Sweeten, became involved in a high-speed pursuit of a pickup truck. The pursuit lasted about eight miles before Officer John Kerr lost control of the police unit and it veered off State Highway 137 and smashed into a culvert about three miles south of Quapaw. Officer Greg Sweeten sustained minor injuries. Officer John Kerr suffered severe back injuries and died a week later on the evening of Wednesday, March 18 at St. John Hospital in Tulsa, three days before his forty-first birthday.


Officer John Kerr was survived by his wife Carol, a son, a daughter plus a stepson and stepdaughter and is buried in Golden Cemetery, Golden, Jefferson County, Colorado.


The driver of the pursued pickup, Jerry Buchanan, Jr., 18, was arrested later and charged with several misdemeanor and felony charges connected to the pursuit.


OLEM – 2N-2-18    NLEOM – 3W10

 

March 7, 2021



Carl V. "Poncho" Kime Jr. - Canine Officer


Tulsa Police Department


About 2 a.m. on Monday, November 5, 1979, while on routine patrol Officer Carl Kime observed an open door on the Sooner Insurance Merchandise business at 5710 E. 11th St. Officer Carl Kime, twenty-nine, and his German Shepard canine partner “Smokey” entered the open door to search for possible burglars.


Retired Oklahoma Highway Patrol Trooper Herbert Hellen was working as a security guard for the business that night and only minutes earlier had chased two burglars from the store. Apparently Herbert Hellen thought they were returning when he saw a silhouetted figure at the door of the office he was in using the telephone. Herbert Hellen fired at the figure with a .12-gauge shotgun from about thirty-five feet away. Most of the buckshot hit Officer Carl Kime in the neck and left side killing him. “Smokey” crawled on top of his mortally wounded handler and held police at bay until other canine officers arrived and were able to coax “Smokey” away.


Officer Carl Kime was survived by his wife, Kathleen and two daughters ages 1 and 4 and is buried in Floral Haven Memorial Gardens Cemetery, Broken Arrow, Tulsa County, Oklahoma.


No criminal charges were brought against retired Trooper Herbert Hellen.


OLEM – 2N-1-9    NLEOM – 38W7


March 8, 2021




William  Gene "Billy" Kirby - Chief


Jay Police Department


Shortly after noon on Saturday, November 23, 1974, Chief William Kirby arrested Max Sharp, thirty-nine, for public drunkenness. As Max Sharp was being taken into jail, he began fighting with Chief William Kirby and Deputy Sheriff Frank Jackson. The two officers struggled with their prisoner Max Sharp up three flights of stairs. Just as Chief William Kirby, forty-two, put Max Sharp into a jail cell, Chief Kirby collapsed and died from a heart attack.


Chief William Kirby was survived by his wife and two daughters and is buried in Mount Hermon Cemetery, Jay, Delaware County, Oklahoma.


Max Sharp was charged with first degree manslaughter in Chief William Kirby’s death.


OLEM – 10N3-1    NLEOM –


March 8, 2021



George "Johnson" Kirk - Deputy Constable


City of Braggs


On Friday, June 18, 1909, three men attempted to rob the crew of a railroad train as it pulled away from Illinois Station four miles from Braggs in Muskogee County. When shots were exchanged between the trainmen and the robbers, the robbers jumped off the train and the train pulled away. As the train passed nonstop through Braggs, one of the crewmen threw a note onto the depot platform telling of the attempted robbery.  Braggs Constable Wicks was on the platform, read the note and summoned Deputy Constable “Johnson” Kirk. Following directions on the note the officers went to the location where the robbers jumped off the train and quickly located the three men hiding in some woods. As the officers approached the three men, one of them slashed Constable Wicks on the arm with a razor and another fatally shot Deputy Constable “Johnson” Kirk in the head. Constable Wicks was able to shoot and capture one of the men, Paul Williams, but the other two escaped.

         

Deputy Constable George “Johnson” Kirk, twenty-two, was survived by his wife Annie and two-year-old son Conrad and is buried in South Bethel Cemetery, Braggs, Muskogee County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 9S-1-8    NLEOM – 61W26


March 8, 2021




T. John Kirk - City Marshal


City of Marble City


Just after midnight on Sunday, October 1, 1911, City Marshal John Kirk, fifty-three, ordered a group of men involved in a drunken brawl to disperse and go home or he would arrest them. The “rowdies” turned on the unarmed city marshal and beat him “insensible” with clubs. City Marshal John Kirk died of his injuries thirty hours later at 6 a.m. Monday morning, October 2nd. Six men were arrested for the killing of City Marshal John Kirk.


City Marshal John T. Kirk was survived by his wife Minnie and six children ages twenty-seven to eight years of age and is buried in Marble City Cemetery, Marble City, Sequoyah County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 10S-2-10 (T John)    NLEOM –


March 8, 2021





William "Bill" Kirksey - Deputy U.S. Marshal/Posseman


U.S. Marshal


Joe Henderson leased land in the Chickasaw Nation. On Wednesday, March 18, 1885, Joe Henderson found that two of his horses had been stolen and he believed he knew the thieves. Joe Henderson traveled to Fort Smith, Arkansas to report the theft of the horses. Arrest warrants were issued for two brothers, Jim and Tom “Pink” Lee. The warrant was turned over to Deputy U. S. Marshal James H. Guy, who also was a Sergeant with the U.S. Indian Police.


A murder warrant had also been issued for a black man named Dallas Humby and Deputy Marshal James Guy had information that Dallas Humby might also be at the Lee ranch. Dallas Humby was accused of killing his wife and had avoided apprehension earlier. Deputy Marshal James Guy was anxious to make the arrest.


On Friday, May 1, 1885, Deputy Marshal James Guy gathered a posse of thirteen men, including William “Bill” Kirksey and brothers James L. “Jim” and Andrew C. “Andy” Roff. The posse proceeded to the Lee ranch near Dresden (now Gene Autry) a small-town northeast of Ardmore.


After dismounting, the officers surrounded the Lee home. Deputy U.S. Marshal James Guy called out for the Lee’s to come out of the house to answer warrants. Someone inside the house asked who it was and for them to come to the front of the house where they could talk. Deputy Marshal James Guy walked to the front of the house and stood by a tree.


The posse was immediately met by gunfire coming from within the house. Deputy Marshal James Guy was struck by two bullets and died during his fall to the ground. The posse members returned fire and a shootout ensued. Posse Andy Roff was struck by five bullets and his brother Posse Jim Roff, once. As the gunfight increased, Posse Bill Kirksey fell from shotgun fire. All three posse died within minutes and the remainder of the posse grabbed their horses and retreated.


The posse reported the killings to the Sheriff in Sherman, Texas who notified the U.S. Indian Police and the U.S. Marshal. A posse of Deputy U.S. Marshals, Indian Police and Sheriff’s deputies  started for the Lee Ranch. The posse found only the house burned and the bodies of the four murdered officers.


Not until September 7, 1885 when Heck Thomas, Jim Taylor and Jim Shattel were in the Gainesville, Texas area were the Lee brothers brought down. The Lee brothers were spotted trying to cut their way through a fence. The lawmen crept to within forty or fifty yards and called out to the Lees. Both Jim and Pink started firing at the posse with rifles. The lawmen returned fire until both Lee brothers, Jim and Pink, were dead.


The other men were later arrested and acquitted at their trials.


The burial site of Deputy Marshal James Guy is unknown. His three possemen, including William “Bill” Kirksey, are buried in Hibbit Cemetery, Sturgeon, Cooke County, Texas.

 

OLEM – 10N-2-11    NLEOM – 35W11


March 8, 2021




Henry W. Klaber - Assistant Chief


Okmulgee Police Department


On Sunday, November 15, 1908, Jimmy Grayson had filed a complaint against a black gunsmith named Newt Decker over an argument about a day’s catch of fish. Okmulgee Assistant Chief of Police Henry Klaber and two brothers, Ralph and Felix Chapman, who were deputized to assist Chief Henry Klaber, went to Newt Decker’s house at Second and Creek Street with Jimmy Grayson. As the men approached the house, Newt Decker, an expert shot, ran out shooting with guns in both hands. Assistant Chief Henry Klaber was shot in the throat and died soon after. The Chapman brothers ran to Assistant Chief Henry Klaber’s aid, firing at Newt Decker with the fallen chief’s gun. Newt Decker shot and killed both Chapman brothers, Ralph and Felix, then ran back into his house. Okmulgee Chief of Police Dick Farr rode up on his horse and tried to assist the fallen Henry Klaber. Newt Decker shot Chief Dick Farr in the right shoulder. Chief Farr took a shot at Newt Decker with his left hand and felt he struck Decker because he saw him whirl around as he fired. Undaunted, Newt Decker fired again wounding Chief Dick Farr again in his left arm. Sheriff William Edgar Robinson, the first elected Sheriff of Okmulgee County, arrived on the scene and was soon also shot dead by Newt Decker. Other officers responded and the gunfight lasted over an hour with over five hundred shots being fired. Two other officers were wounded in the shootout as well as three bystanders. The officers finally set the house next to Newt Decker’s on fire. The fire spread to Newt Decker’s house. As Newt Decker came to the door he was shot and fell back inside the house to burn to death.

Assistant Chief Henry Klaber, thirty-nine, was survived by his wife Luella and four children and is buried in Okmulgee Cemetery, Okmulgee, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 8S-1-1    NLEOM – 23E23


March 8, 2021




Bolivar Thornton "Doc" Knight - Deputy Sheriff


Seminole County Sheriff's Office


About 4 a.m. the morning of Saturday, July 27, 1912, a group of five Seminole County deputies were concealed in the woods on the Little River near Sasakwa attempting to catch bootleggers. They had a rope stretched across the road to halt traffic when two black men in a buggy came down the road.  When the horses hit the rope, they stopped abruptly, throwing the two men out of the buggy. A gunfight ensued and Deputy Sheriff Bolivar “Doc” Knight was killed by a shotgun blast.


The suspects, Sancho Barkus and Martin Davis, escaped but were later located. Sancho Barkus died of wounds received in a shootout with Deputy Sheriff D. A. Marlow when Marlow attempted to arrest Barkus.


Martin Davis was arrested in St. Louis, Missouri, returned to Seminole and convicted of Deputy Sheriff Bolivar “Doc” Knight’s death.


Deputy Bolivar “Doc” Knight was survived by his wife Linda and two children and is buried in Egypt Cemetery, Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 8S-1-25    NLEOM –


March 8, 2021





James Merritt Knight – Constable

Cherokee Junction, Cherokee Nation, I.T.


Cherokee Junction was a small settlement a short distance from Fort Smith across the Arkansas River in Indian Territory. About 7:30 p.m., just after dark, the evening of Saturday, September 28, 1901, Constable James Knight, thirty-two, was going to his home when he heard a man “whooping and shooting” on the nearby Iron Mountain railroad tracks. Constable James Knight went upon the tracks and saw a man, apparently drunk, staggering down the railroad tracks. Constable James Knight started after the man. When within about twenty feet of the man, Constable Knight called to the man to surrender himself. The man instead quickly wheeled around and fired a gun shot at Constable Knight, striking him in the left breast below the heart. The drunk man then fled and was never identified. Constable James Knight was unable to give a description of his assailant before he died a few hours later.


Constable James Knight was born in Crawford County, Arkansas and was the eldest of seven children.


Constable James Knight was survived by his wife of twelve years, Ellen “Annie”, and their four children, ages nine to two years of age.


The burial site of Constable James Knight is unknown.


OLEM – 9N-2-9    NLEOM –


March 8, 2021




Joseph M. Kroskey - Special Officer


Santa Fe Railroad


About 11 p.m. on Thursday, February 22, 1912, three Guthrie Police Officers and Special Detective Joseph Kroskey met the train coming in from Perry looking for two negro men who had committed an armed robbery in Perry earlier in the evening. The officers saw the two men get off the train. When the officer called for them to stop the two men ran.  One of the fleeing men, Denise Alexander, was apprehended by the other officers. Detective Joseph Kroskey fired two shots at his fleeing suspect and the suspect fired two shots back the detective. One of the fleeing suspect’s bullets fatally wounded Special Detective Joseph Kroskey when it pierced his aorta. The fleeing suspect was tracked and indications were that he got on a south bound train to Oklahoma City. The other suspect, Denise Alexander, had named his accomplice as Jim Pearson. Guthrie officers notified Oklahoma City Police and Jim Pearson was arrested by Oklahoma City Chief of Police Bill Tilghman the next day.


The forty-year old Special Detective Joseph Kroskey was single.


The burial site of Special Detective Joseph Kroskey or Kruskey is unknown.


OLEM – 5N-5-7    NLEOM – 49W28


March 8, 2021




Mark Kuykendall - Posse, Deputy U.S. Marshal/


U.S. Marshal


On Monday, January 17, 1887, four lawmen, Deputy U.S. Marshal John Phillips and his three posse, Henry Smith, Mark Kuykendall and William Kelly, arrested Seaborn Green (also known as Kalijah) an eighteen-year-old Creek Indian who was wanted on a federal warrant for selling whiskey in the Indian Territory. After the arrest, the lawmen established a campsite near Hillabee (twenty miles northwest of Eufaula near present Stidham), I.T. Deputy Marshal John Phillips left his three posse in charge of Seaborn Green while he returned to Eufaula on business.


The three posse agreed to take turns watching the prisoner during the night. William Kelly drew the first watch. Sometime during the night, either Pose William Kelly fell asleep or was surprised by Seaborn Green who had obtained the camp axe. Posse William Kelly was struck in the neck by the axe, with his head almost severed. Seaborn Green then used the axe on Posse Mark Kuykendall and Posse Henry Smith striking them both in the head killing them. Seaborn Green then piled logs around the bodies and set fire to the bed clothing and logs to burn the bodies.


The following day Deputy Marshal John Phillips returned to the gruesome site at the camp. His entire posse was dead, and Seaborn Green was gone. Deputy Marshal John Phillips discovered that all weapons had been taken from the camp. Deputy Marshal John Phillips buried his fellow lawmen near the campsite and then went in search of Seaborn Green.


For the next eleven days Deputy Marshal John Phillips looked for Seaborn Green. Deputy Marshal Phillips finally located and arrested Seaborn Green on January 28th. Seaborn Green tried to claim it was an unknown person who had entered the camp and killed the three posse. At his trial held in Fort Smith on July 13, 1887, Seaborn Green was found guilty of three counts of murder after he admitted he had committed all three murders alone. Seaborn Green was sentenced to death by hanging and the sentence was carried out on October 7, 1887, when he was hung on the courthouse property.


The exact burial site of Posse William Kelly, Mark Kuykendall, and Henry Smith, near present day Stidham is unknown.


OLEM – 4S-1-7    NLEOM – 42W8


January 17, 2022