Oklahoma Law Enforcement Memorial

David James Wade – Deputy Sheriff


Logan County Sheriff’s Office


Tuesday morning April 18, 2017, about 9:15 a.m. Deputy Wade, 40, was serving an eviction notice at a rural home in Mulhall along Mulhall Road, about a mile west of I-35. After serving the notice Deputy Wade was confronted in the front yard of the residence by three people, including 45 year old Nathan LeForce.  LeForce was not being evicted however he pulled a gun and shot the deputy several times. Deputy Wade was able to return fire but did not hit LeForce. LeForce then stole the deputy’s patrol pickup and drove away. Deputy Wade was able to radio for help advising that he had been shot. When responding officers arrived they found Wade coherent and he was able to give information on the shooting and his assailant. Deputy Wade was then flown by helicopter to OU Medical Trauma Center in Oklahoma City.


Nathan LeForce drove the stolen patrol pickup to Smitty’s One Stop, a nearby convenience store, where he car jacked a gray 2010 Mazda from a woman and drove southwest on State Highway 33, toward Guthrie. About 10:45 a.m., authorities located the stolen Mazda near County Road and Jaxton Road, just northeast of Guthrie. For several hours dozens of officers from surrounding jurisdictions searched the wooded area for LeForce. Shortly after 2 p.m., state highway patrol troopers advised that they had LeForce in custody after finding him hiding in an outbuilding at 4250 Jaxton Road.


Deputy Wade died from his wounds on the operating table at the OU Medical Center at 11:51 a.m. He had been a Deputy Sheriff about three years.


Deputy Wade was survived by his wife Emily and three sons, one of whom was serving in the U.S. Marines.


LeForce was convicted of Deputy Wade’s murder and sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole
.


OLEM – 10S-1-14    NLEOM – 7W31


September 20, 2019




William James Walker - Trooper


Oklahoma Highway Patrol


Around 6:30 p.m. on the evening of Wednesday, February 17, 1971, Trooper William “Bill” Walker and Park Superintendent T. Leo Newton were shot to death while attempting to arrest Edwin E. Jones, 25, and his cousin, William B. Franklin, 23, for possessing firearms inside the Fountainhead State Park.  Jones was AWOL from the Army and Franklin was an ex-convict.  Game Ranger W. L. Pickens, 61, was wounded in the incident.  The thirteen year old son of Newton was riding his motorcycle down the winding driveway when he came upon the tragic scene discovering that one of the murdered men was his own father. The two suspects fled on foot but cold weather and hunger drove them to surrender a couple of days later.  Both Franklin and Jones were convicted in the connection with the shootings. Franklin was sentenced to die for killing Trooper Walker. In 1973, that sentence was commuted to life in prison. He was also given a life term for Superintendent Newton’s death. Jones received two life sentences for the murders and 20 years for assault with intent to kill in the wounding of Ranger Pickens. Jones’ conviction was overturned in 1983. Jones was retried in 1985, and Franklin testified that he did all of the shooting.  Jones was acquitted.  


Walker had been a Trooper for four years and was survived by his wife, Jeanette, and two sons.




Isaac "Chute" Walkingstick - Sheriff


Goingsnake District, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory


On Saturday July 29, 1894, Sheriff Walkingstick arrested a full-blood Cherokee man in Muskogee for some misdemeanor charge and was in the process of taking him to jail. On the way, another full-blood Cherokee man named Johnson Corntassel accosted Sheriff Walkingstick. Described as “crazy drunk”, Corntassel demanded that the sheriff release his prisoner. When Sheriff Walkingstick refused to release his prisoner, Corntassel shot the sheriff to death. Corntassel was promptly killed by Sheriff Walkingstick’s unnamed deputy.





John Wall - City Marshal


Tatums


Marshal Wall had been cleaning up the illegal whiskey sales in the northwest Carter County black community of Tatums. The evening of Monday, April 16, 1923, Marshal Wall was called to the door of his home. As he stepped to the door he was hit with the blast of a shotgun fired by someone hidden by the scrubs near the door. Marshal Wall lived about three hours but died just after midnight. Before dying he stated he saw two men run from his yard after he was shot. Three men were charged with the murder of the black City Marshal but were acquitted of the charges.




Lewis Palmer Wallace - Sheriff


Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office


On Monday afternoon, July 31, 1933, Mr. O. Sheppard had his car stolen in Meeker and notified Sheriff “Lew” Palmer.  Sheppard armed himself with a shotgun and joined the posse in search for the car.  Upon spotting the car, the officers engaged in a pursuit with the car thief. The thief soon abandoned the car and fled into some heavy underbrush.  The posse went after the man while Sheriff Wallace went around the area in hopes of cutting the man off.  Coming through the heavy underbrush, Sheppard saw Sheriff Wallace and mistaking him for the car thief, yelled “Stick ‘em up!”  The Sheriff raised his hand and waved at Sheppard. Sheppard misinterpreted the wave as the fugitive going for his gun and shot once hitting Sheriff Wallace in the chest.  The Sheriff died from his wound two days later shortly after 10 P.M. on Wednesday, August 2, 1933. As he lay dying, the Sheriff begged that O. Sheppard, who fired the fatal shot, be absolved of blame, repeating, “It really was my fault.”





John Henry Walner – Deputy U.S. Marshal / Officer


U.S. Marshal / U.S. Indian Police


In the 1870’s John Walner was a pioneer of Cherokee Town, two miles east of Pauls Valley and married there in 1883. In 1886, John Walner founded the town of Walner ten miles further south and opened the first store in town. The next year the town’s name was changed to Wynnewood.


For a while John Walner served as the resident Deputy U.S. Marshal in Wynnewood. John Walner was involved in at least one shooting while serving in that capacity. A man named Bill Lewis was nursing a grudge against Deputy Marshal Walner for some unknown reason. One day, Bill Lewis was in John Mitchell’s general store in Wynnewood, bragging that he had killed eight men and “before the day is out, I’m going to kill another one.” As Bill Lewis walked out of the store, he observed Deputy Marshal John Walner walking down the other side of the street. Both men were carrying Winchester rifles cradled in their arms. Deputy Marshal John Walner crossed the street and confronted Bill Lewis, saying “Bill, I heard you were going to kill me.”


Bill Lewis started to raise his Winchester rifle and Deputy Marshal John Walner fatally shot him without bringing his rifle up to his shoulder. This gunfight and a mistaken impression that he was killed may have been the reason for his being listed on the Oklahoma Law Enforcement Memorial and the Fort Smith Honor Roll.


John Walner later resigned his Deputy Marshal and Indian Police commissions but remained in Wynnewood as a merchant. John Walner, 43, had no law enforcement status at the time of his death the evening of July 5, 1905, when he was stabbed in the leg trying to separate two men who were fighting outside the Jesse Knox’s saloon where he was working. One of the men fighting was John Walner’s nephew Robert Walner, who had pulled a pocketknife and was stabbing the other man, Jesse Knox. Jesse Knox was stabbed thirteen times. John Walner’s leg wound had severed a femoral artery and he soon bled to death. Robert Walner was arrested and charged with the murder of his uncle John Walner.


John Walner was survived by his wife, Lula, a son, Hugh, 12, and three daughters, Susan, 22, Acca, 20, and Julia, 19, and is buried in Oaklawn Cemetery, Wynnewood, Garvin County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 5N-1-18


August 3, 2021




A.L. Walton - Patrolman

Oklahoma City Police Department


A.L. Walton was born in Scottsboro, Alabama, November 22, 1882. After moving to

Oklahom City A.L. Walton worked for the railroad for several years before joining the Oklahoma City Police Department.


The Month of October of 1923 saw record rainfall in Oklahoma City. On October 16, the North Canadian River overflowed its banks with crest waters twenty-five feet high, flooding everything as far north as California Avenue. Businesses, homes, railroad tracks were washed away, leaving fifteen thousand people homeless and stranded. Beginning on Monday, October 22, 1923, Patrolman A. L. Walton worked thirty-six hours straight, wading into the cold waters repeatedly carrying numerous stranded people including many children to safety.


Although Patrolman A. L. Walton was ordered to go off duty at one point by Mayor O. A. Cargill, Patrolman Walton refused to leave until everyone was rescued. Patrolman A. L. Walton continued to work until he collapsed with a high fever Tuesday afternoon, October 23.


Patrolman A. L. Walton was taken to the hospital for treatment. While in the hospital Patrolman A. L. Walton developed pneumonia and died at 4 p.m. Friday, October 26, 1923.


Patrolman A. L. Walton was survived by his wife and six children, the oldest child was fourteen.


Patrolman A. L. Walton is buried in Rose Hill Cemetery in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma.


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August 2, 2021





Gary Lee Ward - Detective


Oklahoma City Police Department


Automobile Theft Division Detective Gary Ward, 44, was filling in for his brother-in-law, Detective Les McCaleb, at an off-duty security job at the Holiday Inn on NW 39th Street near Portland Avenue on the night of Saturday, February 2, 1985.


Shortly before 11 p.m. a man walked up to the motel’s main desk and told a clerk he wanted to register but asked if he could first see the room.  After giving the man a key to one of the rooms, the clerk grew suspicious and asked Detective Gary Ward to check on the man.  Detective Ward, dressed in his police uniform, saw a man carrying a television set out of a first-floor room.  A scuffle ensued and Detective Gary Ward was shot once in the chest apparently with his own service revolver and died at the scene.


On Friday, February 8th, the suspect Alvin Parker was found crouched in a crawlspace under his parent’s house with Detective Gary Ward’s service revolver found wrapped in plastic and in a small box only about a foot away. Glen Anthony Briggs, 28, whose car was found at the scene of the killing, was taken into custody, but later released due to lack of evidence against him.


Alvin Parker was on parole at the time of his arrest, after serving four years of a ten-year armed robbery sentence. Alvin Parker was convicted of the murder of Detective Gary Ward and sentenced to one hundred and ninety-nine years in prison.


Detective Gary Ward was survived by his wife, Martha, and three children, sons Joe, 22, and Danny, 13, and daughter, Terri, 20.


Gary Ward is buried in Resthaven Gardens Cemetery, Oklahoma City, Cleveland County, Oklahoma.


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February 2, 2021





James Ward - Deputy Sheriff


Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office



On Wednesday, August 20, 1919, Tulsa County Deputy James Ward entered the Stradford Hotel after residents in the north Tulsa community had complained about the “vice conditions,” illegal liquor and gambling.  Sixteen people were arrested for gambling.  When Deputy Ward entered the hotel, Deputy Ed Neeley was participating in the “game.” Information was that Deputy Neeley was upset with Deputy Ward over the fact that Ward was raiding “choc” joints that Neeley was protecting.  According to the county attorney’s office, “…Neeley was in a game when Ward entered to raid the place, and that Neeley shot Ward while in the discharge of his duty.” Deputy Neeley claimed self-defense stating Deputy Ward had fired first. The county attorney charged Ed Neeley with the murder of Deputy Sheriff James Ward. Neeley was later brought to trial for murder, but was acquitted based on self-defense. Sheriff James Wooley did not let the court’s decision keep him from taking Deputy Neeley’s commission, ending his career with the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office.





James Ward - Posseman - Deputy U.S. Marshal


U. S. Marshal Service

 

James Ward was was one of eleven people killed and as many as nineteen wounded on Monday, April 15, 1872, at the Whitmire Schoolhouse east of Tahlequah, near the modern town of Christie in Adair County in the Going Snake District of the Cherokee Nation.  


Zeke Proctor was being tried by the Cherokee Nation at the schoolhouse for accidentally killing a widow named Polly Beck Hildebrand.  The relatives of Polly convinced the federal court at Fort Smith to intervene in the case. The U.S. Commissioner issued an arrest warrant for Zeke Proctor on a charge of “assault with intent to kill” to Deputy U.S. Marshals Jacob G. Owens and Joseph S. Peavey. The Deputy Marshals led a deputized posse including friends and relatives of Polly Beck Hildebrand to the schoolhouse. As the federal posse entered the schoolhouse a massive gun battle erupted.  Posse members Jesse “Black Sut” Beck, Samuel Beck, William Hicks, George Selvidge, James Ward, and Riley Woods were shot and killed that day. Deputy U.S. Marshal Jacob Owens and Posse William Beck were also wounded and died the next day, April 16th from their gunshot wounds.


James Ward was survived by his wife Elizabeth and is buried in Calvary Cemetery, Fort Smith, Sebastian County, Arkansas.


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April 15, 2022




Robert Arthur Warlick - Detective


Shawnee Police Department


Shortly before 6 P.M. the evening of Thursday May 31, 1934, Detective Warlick and Captain Claude J Bowen were in route to a call when their patrol car collided with another car at a Shawnee intersection. Detective Warlick was crushed into the steering wheel. Captain Bowen was thrown from the car and struck a fireplug. Detective Warlick died shortly after arriving at the hospital. Captain Bowen died just over a year later and is believed to have died from complications from the accident. His wife and two daughters survived detective Warlick.





Charles Thomas Warner - Deputy U.S. Marshal


U. S. Marshal


On Thursday, December 29, 1932, Deputy Warner left his home in Bartlesville and traveled to Vinita with thirteen other lawmen from Oklahoma and Kansas to track down the men who robbed a bank on December 9th in Kinsley, Kansas.


They had captured two of the outlaws, but were sure the rest of the holdup gang, numbering five or six, had made their way to Oklahoma in an attempt to avoid capture.  After planning the raid the group left Vinita at 11:00 p.m. traveling to Spavinaw. Surveillance was set up on the small house believed to be where the outlaws were holed up. After throwing several “gas bombs” in the house and riddling it with bullets, four men walked out of the house with their hands raised above their heads. One man remained inside and had to be forcibly dragged outside and handcuffed.  Two of the men were wounded, but not seriously. The prisoners were loaded into cars and taken back to Vinita.  As the prisoners were being loaded, Deputy Warner remarked that he had been hit in the arm and probably needed to have it treated.  It was found that a bullet had entered his forearm just above the wrist, had traveled upward and exited just below the elbow. The doctors found as the bullet had traveled upwards it went between two bones. X-rays showed that the bullet had actually nicked one of the bones.


For the next two years, Deputy Warner kept up his usual work routine. In early 1935 infections set into his arm, and although treated, kept getting worse as time went by. By May 1935 he was confined to his bed and on Thursday, May 23, 1935, he passed away.  Physicians stated the arm wound he received in the gunfight in 1932 was the direct cause of his death.





William Nelson Warren - City Marshal


City of Chandler, Oklahoma Territory

 

On the night of Saturday, May 13, 1893, Marshall William “Nels” Warren was called at his home to investigate some reported trouble at the train depot in Chandler. Upon arriving at the depot, Marshal Warren found three men, Jeff Critser, J.E. Edgington and L.G. Smart in a drunken state and causing the disturbance.  He informed the three men they were under arrest but they refused to surrender and began throwing cinders from the railbed at him. The Marshal was armed with a “loaded cane” and he struck one of the men, breaking his cane and knocking the man to the ground. The other two men fled as the Marshal fired his gun at them.  As the Marshal was going back to handcuff the man on the ground, he fell over onto the depot platform. A doctor, who had been waiting for a train attempted to revive the Marshal. After all efforts failed, he pronounced the Marshal dead. It was ruled he died from apoplexy. Other citizens pursued and caught the two fleeing men. J.E. Edgington was fined $10 in court and the other two men were discharged without punishment. Marshal Warren was survived by his wife, five daughters and a son.





Charles Washington - Police Officer


Ardmore Police Department


Charles Washington joined the Ardmore Police Department on February 1, 1957. On Monday, April 28, 1958, Officer Washington, 49, was on routine duty and stopped in at the Veterans Cab Company where Robert McIntire, 67, was intoxicated and causing a disturbance. Officer Washington told McIntire to go home. McIntire left but soon returned with a .380 automatic pistol and opened fire on the officer striking him in the left forearm, left shoulder and the left side of the stomach. Washington returned fire as he fell to the floor emptying his gun and wounding McIntire under the left armpit and in the right leg. Officer Washington died two days later at 8 a.m. on April 30, 1958 from his wounds.  


Robert McIntire was charged and convicted of officer Washington’s murder and sentenced to life in prison.


Charles Washington is buried in Clearview Cemetery, Ardmore, Carter County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 7N-5-4    NLEOM – 52W12


April 30, 2020




Mitchell DeWayne Weeks - Master Patrolman


McAlester Police Department


The morning of Friday, January 6, 2012, “Mitch” Weeks, 48, was on duty when he first complained of heart burn. About 12:30 PM he went home for his lunch break as usual. About 2 PM friends went to check on him when he did not return to work. They found him lying on the kitchen floor of his home still wearing his gun belt which he usually took off before eating lunch. It appeared that he suffered a massive heart attack soon after entering his home. Paramedics were called to the home but were unable to revive him. Weeks had been a police officer for over 26 years. He was survived by his wife of 27 years, Brenda, their 25 year old son Lance and 18 year old daughter Whitney.




Stanton Weiss - Federal Prohibition Agent


On Saturday, August 28, 1920, Stanton Weiss and Reed Miller, Federal Prohibition Agents, along with Oklahoma County Deputy Sheriffs Claude Tyler and Homer Adrean, went to the home of Charles Chandler, who reportedly was the connection to all the illegal liquor in the area. The lawmen found a still some distance from the house. Agent Miller stayed to guard the still while the other three officers approached the Chandler house. Tyler went to the back door as Weiss and Adrean knocked on the front door. After entering the house, Tyler was sent upstairs to conduct a search. Finding several containers of illegal liquor Tyler leaned his rifle against the wall to take a closer look at his findings. Charles Chandler grabbed the rifle and shot Deputy Tyler in the neck. Hearing the gunshots upstairs, Claude Chandler, the 18 year old son of Charles, pulled a handgun and shot Agent Weiss in the face.  The two Chandler men ran out the backdoor, but first Claude fired once more into the prone Agent Weiss killing him. As Charles Chandler rounded the corner of the house he was shot and killed by Deputy Adrean. Claude Chandler, who was following his father, then shot Deputy Adrean, killing him. Agent Miller, hearing the gunfire, ran toward the house and was met by Claude Chandler running away from the house. Miller arrested Claude Chandler and recovered a .32 caliber revolver that Chandler had thrown into the bushes.


Deputy Tyler was taken to St. Anthony Hospital in Oklahoma City where he made a full recovery.  Claude Chandler was taken to the Oklahoma County Jail in Oklahoma City. Shortly after 10 p.m. the next evening, a mob of about 30 men broke into the jail, removed Chandler and he was found hanging from a tree on Reno Avenue the following morning.


Agent Stanton Weiss was survived by his wife.




Franklin Pierce West - Officer


Cherokee Tribal Police


Officer West was attending a Christmas dance on Friday, December 17, 1886, at the Emachaya Creek home of Lucy Surratt, daughter of Emachaya.  Emachaya was one of the earliest Choctaws to settle in the vicinity of Whitefield. Emachaya Creek was named after Lucy’s father. Lucy was known to the locals as “Aunt Lucy.” Belle and Sam Starr arrived at the dance just after dark with Belle’s two children. Officer West was warming himself by a log fire when Sam Starr, 27, began to curse him for killing Belle’s favorite horse during an earlier gun battle when West and a posse arrested Sam Starr. Sam reached for his gun at the same time Frank drew his weapon. After gunshots rang out, both men were on the ground mortally wounded. Officer West had been hit in the neck and died within minutes.  Starr was shot in the chest and died a few moments later. Frank West, 34, was buried just east of Briartown at the McClure Cemetery and was survived by his wife and two children.




William A. West - Patrolman


Cushing Police Department

 

Just after midnight on Saturday, July 18, 1931, two men broke into the home of Phil Estes, the manager of the Pla-More Poolhall,. in Cushing. Estes was bound, gagged and robbed of the daily take from the poolhall, which he had taken home with him that night.  Estes was able to get loose and call the police after the suspects fled. He told police that he had seen the men go into a nearby garage. Officers William “Billy” West and Corbett Ritter, went to the garage to question the night watchman. West entered and went to a lighted office at the back of the garage. Upon entering the office, West was shot twice in the heart and leg by a man hiding under the desk. West was able to return fire before he fell and died at the scene. J.B. Carnell was arrested in Lawton two days later and Harold Harris surrendered himself the next day. J.B. Carnell was given 99 years in prison for murdering Officer West. Officer West was survived by his wife and one son.




Robert Glen Westberry - Special Agent in Charge


Defense Investigative Service

Robert Westberry joined the Naval Investigative Service in 1969.  Prior to that, he served with the Daytona Beach Police Department and the Florida Highway Patrol.  He served a year in Vietnam for the Naval Investigative Service and then joined the Defense Department in 1972. He spent six years in South Carolina and seven years in South Florida before he requested to be sent to Oklahoma City so his wife could be close to her mother who was in failing health. He served for two years as the Special Agent in Charge for the Oklahoma City office of the Defense Department’s Defense Investigative Service until his death the morning of Wednesday, April 19, 1995, when the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building occurred. He had intended to retire in two years.  


Special Agent Westbery, 57, was survived by his wife Tillie, one son, two daughters and seven grandchildren.  He was preceded in death by one daughter.


Robert Westberry is buried in Highland Memory Gardens Cemetery, Forest City, Seminole County, Florida.


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April 20, 2020



Alan Gerald Whicher - Assistant Special Agent In Charge


U. S. Secret Service


Before his death the morning of Wednesday, April 19, 1995, when the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City was bombed, Agent Whicher served in the New York field office, liaison division, vice presidential protection detail and the presidential protective division. Agent Whicher had been one of President Clinton’s personal bodyguards until being promoted to Assistant Special Agent in Charge of the Oklahoma City field office seven months before his death. President Clinton attended Whicher’s funeral in Rockville, Maryland.


Twenty minutes before the bombing Alan Whicher had phoned his wife Pam at home to give her a pep talk and wish her good luck before she gave a speech that day at a women’s Bible study at Oklahoma City University.


Agent Whicher was survived by his wife Pam, daughters Meredith and Melinda and son Ryan.


Alan Whicher is buried in Gates of Heaven Cemetery, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, Maryland.


OLEM – 2N-3-14    NLEOM – 34W20


April 20, 2020



Cornelius Walton White - Detective


Tulsa Police Department

 

On Thursday, May 17, 1951, Detective White, 53, had arrested Henry Rogers for the rape of an eight-year-old girl and was transporting him to the police station.  Close to First and Elgin Streets, Rogers drew a concealed .32 caliber revolver and shot Detective White once in the chest.  The bullet went through both lungs, the aorta and lodged in his left arm.  Rogers escaped on foot but was soon located near the 1300 block of North Greenwood. Rogers was immediately surrounded by fourteen officers. A gun battle ensued during which Rogers wounded two officers (non-fatally) before he was shot five times, three of the shots being to his head, killing him.




Elda Lawrence White - City Marshal


City of Paden


On Friday, June 15, 1962, Marshal “Bigun” White arrested a young man named Larry Cooper for shooting off fireworks and took him to jail.


The next night, Saturday, June 16th, Henry Cooper and his wife, Larry’s parents, were driving and saw Marshal White in his car along Highway 62, the main street of Paden. The couple stopped and confronted White about what they thought was the mistreatment of their son the day before. Mrs. Cooper claimed that Marshal White had struck their son with a blackjack during his arrest. Standing by the Cooper’s car, White and the couple exchanged words. Mrs. Cooper pulled a .32 automatic pistol from her purse and handed it to her husband, who then shot Marshal White in the chest.  The Coopers then left the scene as the marshal walked back to his car holding his stomach. White was taken to a hospital in Prague then later transferred to St. Anthony’s Hospital in Oklahoma City where he was pronounced dead on arrival.


 Henry Cooper was arrested by an Oklahoma Highway Patrol trooper near Okemah. Cooper claimed that he had fired in self-defense, stating that Chief White had tried to draw his gun on him first.  The men who took White to the hospital in Oklahoma City stated that his weapon was strapped in his holster. Henry Cooper pled guilty to manslaughter but appealed his sentence and only served 14 months.


 Marshal White was survived by his wife Daisy and daughters, Maxine and Virginia.


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Robbie Chase Whitebird - Deputy Sheriff


Seminole County Sheriffs Office


About 3 P.M. Sunday afternoon, July 26, 2009, the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office received a call to the Holbert home at 503 N. Second Street in Seminole. Mrs. Holbert advised that her 26 year old son Ezekiel Holbert was in her home, she did not want him there and that there was an arrest warrant out for him for “Domestic Abuse” from an incident in February when he tried to choke her.


 Deputy Sheriff “Chase” Whitebird, Captain Williams and a Seminole Lighthorse officer went to the Holbert home. Deputy Whitebird and Captain Williams went to the front door while the Lighthorse officer went to the back door. As Whitebird and Williams started to enter the front door Ezekiel Holbert open fire on them with a 9mm Kel-Tec rifle, striking Whitebird in the face killing him. Williams was shot once in the front right side by Holbert but was able to run from the house. Williams died on the way to the hospital. A female neighbor across the street from the Holbert home was also struck by a bullet but survived. Holbert surrendered to officers about 7 P.M. after a standoff at the house. Captain Williams had been with the sheriff’s office since 2002 and was survived by his wife, his son Shawn who is also a deputy and three daughters.





Thomas Leroy Whitehead - Deputy U.S. Marshal


U. S. Marshal


On Tuesday, December 8, 1891, Marshal Whitehead, 19, and his posseman, Josiah Poorboy, were staying at Cherokee Nation Judge L. W. Shirley’s home in order to keep watch on the house of Annie Hitchcock.  Annie was the daughter of Judge Shirley.  A charge of adultery was filed against Jim Craig in federal court in Ft. Smith, Arkansas.  The indictment alleged Craig had been sexually involved with Annie Hitchcock.


Craig has been arrested by Deputy U.S. Marshal Charles Lamb but had escaped from custody. Lamb planned a way to capture Craig by sending in an undercover operative to locate him. Thomas Whitehead agreed to infiltrate the area, locate Craig and make the arrest. He was appointed a Deputy U.S. Marshal.  Whitehead appointed Josiah Poorboy, a young Cherokee, his posse.


Annie Hitchcock asked Waco Hampton, an escapee who had been convicted of manslaughter, John Brown, a white man living with Hampton’s step-father, and John Roach, another young man who was friends with Hampton and Brown, to kill Poorboy and Whitehead. The three men went to the home of Judge Shirley and Hampton called for Whitehead to come outside.  The two lawmen came out carrying rifles. Hampton leveled a rifle at Poorboy and fired, while Brown fired at Whitehead who went down and died within minutes. Poorboy kept firing until he was shot and fell to the ground dead. Roach had been wounded and lay moaning on the ground.


Hampton and Brown fled and were not found until January 30, 1892, by Deputy U.S. Marshal C.A. Bruner. Hampton fired on Bruner when ordered to surrender. Bruner had a double barrel shotgun and opened fire on Hampton killing him and his horse.


John Roach recovered from his wounds and testified against Brown. Brown was tried and sentenced to hang by Judge Isaac C. Parker.  After several appeals, on December 24, 1896, John Brown pled guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to one year in the Columbus, Ohio prison.




Chance Frederick Whiteman III - Officer


Tulsa Police Department


Less than two weeks old, the Tulsa Police Department’s helicopter program suffered its first tragedy on Friday, March 26, 1982.  Pilot Chance Whiteman, 35 and a 5 year veteran of the police department, radioed that he and Officer Kelly Smythe, also a 5 year veteran of the department, would be en route to assist in a high speed chase. That was the last transmission heard from the two officers.  A deputy sheriff found the crash site about 1:30 A.M. Both officers died in the crash. The helicopter had been leased from the Oklahoma City Police Department and was found to have a current (FAA) air worthiness certificate, current annual inspection and all periodic maintenance.  Whiteman was one of two helicopter pilots and had over 1500 hours of flight time. He had flown helicopters for the Army in Vietnam and had survived being shot down twice.  He still flew for the Oklahoma National Guard.  Since it was a new program, the pilots were taking ground officers up to familiarize and orient them with the capabilities. Smythe was taking the place of the regular observer that night and was not assigned to the helicopter unit. Officer Whiteman was survived by his wife and one son, Chance Frederick Whiteman IV.

  




Christopher C. Whitson - Officer


Seminole Police Department


On the afternoon of Saturday, July 4, 1936, the highly respected Officer Chris Whitson of the Seminole Police Department was gunned down in cold blood.  Melvin Harvey of Shawnee was riding with a friend near Seminole when he saw his own car drive past him.  Realizing his car had been stolen he had his friend follow the car until it stopped at Dale’s Tavern.  The men then went to the Seminole Police Department and solicited the assistance of Officer Whitson.  


Whitson returned to the tavern and found the car with two men inside. He approached the car, opened the driver’s door and demanded they get out of the car. The driver, Paul Goodwin, got out. Horace Lindsay, the passenger, was holding a .32 automatic pistol on the officer. Whitson went for his gun, but was shot six times before he could get his gun out of the holster. The two men escaped taking the officer’s weapon with them.


A manhunt involving more than 200 officers began searching for the fugitives. Horace Lindsay surrendered in Shawnee a few days later. He confessed to the killing and led officers to where he had hidden Whitson’s gun. Paul Goodwin was arrested at his brother’s house in Pensacola, FL, on July 20th.


Officer Whitson was survived by his wife, two sons and three daughters.





William Whitson -  Posseman, Deputy U S Marshal


U. S. Marshal


On Saturday, June 30, 1888, Deputy U. S. Marshal John Phillips and his posseman William Whitson, son of Deputy U S Marshal Cal Whitson, had gone 20 miles east of Eufaula and waited in hiding along a trail in the area of a “green corn” dance in an attempt to locate Daniel Thompson, a Creek Indian prisoner who had escaped from them. The officers also had warrants for a Creek Indian bootlegger, robber and murderer named Wesley Barnett and one of his gang, a Ute Indian named San Lopka but did not expect to encounter them that night. Soon the officers observed three men riding down the trail toward them. The men were San Lopka, Wesley Barnett and his brother Watie. When the officers stopped them the men thought they were being arrested and quickly drew their guns and started shooting. In the gun battle Deputy Phillips, posseman Whitson and Watie Barnett were killed. Wesley Barnett was killed in another shootout with Deputy U. S. Marshal on January 13, 1889.




Emery Jasper Whitten - Deputy Sheriff


McCurtain County Sheriff’s Office

 

On Wednesday, August 8, 1934, in the Little River community of Oak Hill just north of Idabel, Deputy Whitten and Constable William Wilmoth along with Sheriff  F.O. “Bud” Stewart entered the home of Mrs. Lecy Rogers in search of the teenage daughter of a local farmer, J. M. Leonard. Sadie, a pretty, slender girl of sixteen, had been missing for three days.


Leonard had not seen his daughter since the close of church services on Sunday, August 5. Leonard told Sheriff Stewart that Sadie had gotten into a car with someone named Paul who was supposed to take her straight home. Paul Jones and Barney Jones, with Jones’ wife and children were reportedly staying at the Rogers place because Barney’s wife had taken ill. Paul never brought Sadie home. When the three officers reached the Rogers home, Ben Rogers, young son of Lecy, was playing in the yard. Ben said the two women were down by the spring washing clothes. Sheriff Stewart went down to the spring to question the women about Paul and Sadie’s whereabouts, while the two deputies went into the house to question Barney. Barney became very nervous when questioned stating he was not aware of their whereabouts. Whitten told him that he would have to come with them for further questioning. Barney pulled a revolver and shot pointblank hitting Whitten in the abdomen. A stunned Wilmoth reach for his six-shooter but was too late. Jones shot Wilmoth in the right leg, in the right side below the shoulder and in the neck. Jones grabbed the young Ben Rogers and made him lead him through the woods. Both


Whitten and Wilmoth were taken to a hospital in Paris, Texas where they died from their wounds. It would be discovered later that Barney Jones and Paul Jones were actually Julius Bohannon and Lee Custer and were not brothers at all. They had robbed a Texas bank before coming to Oklahoma.


 Lee Custer and Sadie Leonard had gone to Texas and gotten married and were not aware of the shootings by Bohannon.  They were located in a local motel where Custer was arrested for Bank robbery.


Bohannon was not located and arrested until June 12, 1935, when he tried to reunite with his family. Bohannon was sentenced to 99 years for first degree manslaughter in the case of Constable Wilmoth and to life imprisonment for the murder of Deputy Whitten.

  



Johnnie D. Whittle - Trooper


Oklahoma Highway Patrol


On the morning of Monday, September 14, 1953, Billy Eugene Manley, 18, and Lloyd Shepherd, 16, arrived in Oklahoma City.  These two young men had escaped from a reformatory in Boonesville, Missouri where they had stolen a car and driven it until it broke down on the outskirts of Oklahoma City. The driver, who picked up the two young hitchhikers, thought they acted a little suspiciously so he contacted Director Bivens. Bivens assigned Trooper Whittle to check on the boys. Trooper Whittle located the two boys shortly before 8:30 A.M. and put them into his unmarked patrol car to transport them to OHP headquarters for questioning. As Whittle stopped in the headquarters driveway, Manley drew a .22 automatic pistol from a shoulder holster and held it on the officer. As Whittle started to grab the gun, Manley shot him once fatally. Shepherd tried to grab the gun but Manley shot him in the hand. Manley ran from the scene, but Shepherd stayed with the dying trooper and tried to radio for an ambulance. Manley was captured less than three hours later.  Manley was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to 65 years in prison.  He was recommended for parole in the summer of 1972.





Rolland Timothy “Rolly” Wilcox, - Deputy Sheriff


Stevens County, Kansas


Stevens County, Kansas was just north of what was then called “No man’s land” and later became the Oklahoma panhandle.


The towns of Hugoton and Woodsdale in Stevens County became embroiled in a bitter county seat war in 1886. Hugoton was finally named the county seat. John M. Cross was elected Sheriff of Stevens County over Sam Robinson in a desperately fought race. The embittered Sam Robinson became City Marshal of Hugoton.


In early 1888, City Marshal Sam Robinson processed some county bounds to try and encourage railroad development in the area. His opponents claimed Robinson had illegally overstepped his authority and got a warrant issued for Sam Robinson’s arrest. Sam Robinson and some of his allies fought off attempts to serve the warrant in Hugoton. In July of 1888, Sam Robinson went into “No man’s land” on a camping trip. Woodsdale City Marshal Charles “Ed” Short and a posse were sent to arrest Robinson while he was away from Hugoton. Unable to locate Sam Robinson, City Marshal Ed Short sent back word for more men. County Sheriff John Cross deputized a posse of four men, Ted Eaton, Bob Hubbard, Roland Wilcox, and Herbert Tonney and rode out with them to assist City Marshal Ed Short. In the meantime, City Marshal Ed Short had lost his way and became involved in a gun battle with a posse from Hugoton that pursued him back to Woodsdale. Sam Robinson had learned that Ed Short and his posse were searching for him and returned to Hugoton, recruited a fifteen-man posse and started back to “No man’s land” after Ed Short, unaware that Short had already been chased back to Woodsdale.


On Wednesday, July 25, 1888, unable to find Ed Short or Sam Robinson, Sheriff John Cross and his deputies were returning to Woodsdale when they encountered some men working in a hayfield. The officers bedded down for the night in the hayfield in what is now northern Cimarron County, Oklahoma. The five officers were awakened a few hours later and found themselves the prisoners of Hugoton City Marshal Sam Robinson and his posse. One by one Sheriff John Cross and his four deputies were gunned down by Sam Robinson and his men.


The hay workers witnessed the shootings but were not harmed. This became known as “The Hayfield Massacre”. Hugoton City Marshal Sam Robinson and his posse then returned to Hugoton.

Sheriff John Cross, Deputies Ted Eaton, Bob Hubbard, and Roland Wilcox died at the scene, but Deputy Herbert Tonney survived, and made his way back to Stevens County to testify against Sam Robinson and his posse.  City Marshal Sam Robinson and five of his posse were tried, convicted, and sentenced to be hanged by the Federal Court in Paris, Texas.  They were all released later on appeal when the U. S. Supreme Court ruled that the Paris Federal Court had no jurisdiction in the murder cases as “No Man’s Land” was not part of the United States at the time of the murders.  They were never tried again. “No Man’s Land” was made a part of the Oklahoma Territory by The Oklahoma Organic Act of 1890.


Deputy Rolland Wilcox was survived by his parents Timothy and Harriet Wilcox and was buried in Woodsdale Cemetery, but his grave was moved in 1930 to Moscow Cemetery, Moscow, Stevens County, Kansas.


OLEM – 4N-2-18     NLEOM –


July 25, 2021





Lew Wilder - Special Officer


Chouteau – Former Sheriff Creek County


In 1914 Lew Wilder was elected Sheriff of Creek County and served two terms.  He was injured in a shooting on October 12, 1916, when an armed robber named Alva Taylor was attempted a jailbreak. Sheriff Wilder single-handedly stopped the jailbreak in a gun battle with Taylor. Taylor was killed and Sheriff Wilder was shot four times, once in the bowels, one lung, the hip and kidney. The Sapulpa Herald predicted that Wilder was fatally wounded, but they underestimated the Sheriff. He recovered and served until 1918. After working as a special agent for the Sinclair, Prairie and Texas oil companies for 16 years, he reentered politics and was again elected Sheriff of Creek County for three more terms in that office.  Early in 1942, Wilder was appointed as a special officer in Chouteau.  On Monday, January 26, 1942, Wilder was returning from Chouteau to Kiefer, where he resided, when he was involved in a traffic accident eleven miles east of Tulsa. An ambulance was called to the scene at an abandoned filing station where Wilder had evidently lost control of his car, run off the road and ran into the station. He died from his injuries before reaching the hospital.  He was survived by his wife, an adopted son and a granddaughter.



Oscar Wilkes - Assistant Police Chief


Ardmore Police Department

 

Wilkes joined the Ardmore Police Department after serving in the Navy during World War II. In 1951, he was named Assistant Chief. About 8:30 P.M. on Thursday, January 3, 1952, Wilkes responded to a domestic disturbance call. He pulled his unmarked police car into the driveway of John B. Gandy, a local trucking contractor. Gandy had been drinking earlier with his girlfriend, Jackie Thomas, and they had been quarrelling. Gandy and Thomas went separate ways about 7:45 P.M., after which Thomas had called her ex-husband.  It was the ex-husband that Gandy thought was pulling into his driveway when he fired three shots at the car on that dark rainy night. As Wilkes stepped from his car he was struck in the lower throat and the bullet ranged downward into his heart. He was found lying on his back beside his patrol car with the toothpick he had been chewing still between his lips. Gandy was the father of five children. He was convicted of second degree manslaughter and one year in the county jail. Assistant Chief Wilkes was survived by his wife, two daughters and one son.




Adam Wilkins - Officer


Choctaw Tribal Police


About 6 a.m. the morning of Wednesday, May 26, 1920, the badly mangled body of Officer Adam Wilkins was found on the tracks of the Kansas City Southern Railway halfway between Howe and Heavener. Officer Adam Wilkins had been decapitated. His head was found to have two gunshot wounds also. Officer Adam Wilkins was last known alive about 8 p.m. the night before at his home by a church minister who had stopped by to visit. Officer Adam Wilkins, 38, lived with his wife about two- and one-half miles from where his body was found. Automobile tracks led from his house to near where his body was found. Witnesses stated they heard several gun shots about 9 p.m. the night before near the tracks where Officer Adam Wilkins’ body was found. It was believed that the murder was in retaliation for Officer Adam Wilkins’ strict enforcement of “choc” beer manufacturing laws in the area.


Officer Adam Wilkins was survived by his wife Liffie (Moore) and two sons, Jefferson D, 15, and Woodrow W, 6, and is buried in the Howe Cemetery, Howe, Le Flore County, Oklahoma.

  

A few days later Dan Perry was arrested for the murder of Officer Adam Wilkins however Will Humphreys was later charged with the murder.


 OLEM - 4N-2-2    NLEOM –


May 25, 2022





William Oscar Wilkins - Deputy Sheriff


Choctaw County Sheriff’s Office


About 11:30 a.m. the morning of Wednesday, September 17, 1924, Deputy Wilkins, age 46, was driving the car of Sheriff D. E. McClanahan in route to Durant on official business. Deputy Wilkins’ young son was riding with him when he lost control of the car fifteen miles east of Durant near Bokchito. The car rolled completely over. Deputy Wilkins was killed almost instantly when his head hit a rock as the car rolled. His young son was not seriously injured and went for help. Besides his young son Deputy Wilkins also left a wife.




Kristian Daniel “Kris”Willhight - Officer,

Burns Flat Police Department           

At approximately 9:30 AM the morning of Thursday, January 23, 2014, Washita County Undersheriff Brian Beck, went to the home of Quentin Lee Johnson, in Sentinel, with a felony arrest warrant for Johnson. When Johnson, 27, observed the Undersheriff approaching he jumped in his 2011 Ford pickup truck and sped off. Beck began pursuing Johnson going out of Sentinel. Just after 10 AM at the intersection of CRE1210 and CRN2160 south of Dill City Undersheriff Beck’s SUV collided with the patrol car of Burns Flat Police Officer Kristian Willhight, 36, who was in route to assist Beck in the pursuit. Both officers died at the scene of the accident. About the same time three miles from the officer’s crash Quentin Johnson lost control of his pickup and crashed into a ravine near CRN 2190 and CRE1210 killing him. Kris Willhight worked for the Oklahoma State Reformatory in Granite before going to work for the Mangum and Granite Police Departments. He began working for the Burns Flat Police Department when he moved to Burns Flat in 2010. Officer Willhight was survived by his young daughter Evelyn Michelle Willhight.


OLEM – 4N-1-8    NLEOM – 17E29


Revised Februay 2, 2018




David Coty Williams - Chief of Police


Ryan Police Department


Police Chief Williams, 30, radioed to the Ryan dispatcher that he would be out of his car checking a suspicious subject about 8:45 P.M. on Saturday, January 17, 1987.  His only radio communication after that was the codes of “10-12”, which meant he had someone in the car with him, and “10-23,” that he was in trouble. His patrol car was found partly submerged in a creek about a mile southeast of town.  Five hours later his wet and frozen body was found in a snow-covered, icy field a quarter-mile from the car. He had not taken his two-way radio or his gloves and his uniform coat was unzipped when he was found. Witnesses stated that Williams had been seen talking to a man with red and white striped paint on his face just before 9 P.M. Reece Alton Hicks was arrested and charged with kidnapping and murder. Later that year Hicks was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to five years in prison.





E. C. Williams - City Marshal


Enid, Oklahoma Territory


Marshal Williams was an educated man. He was born in San Francisco, CA, and went to the finest schools in Boston. He moved to Oklahoma with the opening of the Cherokee Strip.


On the evening of Wednesday, June 26, 1895, R. W. Patterson, Registrar of the United States Land Run, became furious with J. L. Isenberg, owner of the Enid Daily Wave. Isenberg had been running articles about Patterson that were offensive in nature. The last article accused Patterson of infidelity, among other things, and Patterson had finally had enough. He armed himself and went to find Isenberg.  As they were quarreling, Marshal Williams arrived on the scene.  Patterson fired his gun at Isenberg.  Isenberg ran into the drugstore with Patterson in pursuit.  Williams quickly followed shouting for Patterson to quit shooting.  Patterson turned and fired at Williams striking him over the heart.  Williams, although fatally wounded, ran after Patterson. Clutching his chest, Williams braced himself against the door and fired at Patterson striking him in the temple and killing him instantly.  Both men died at the scene.


Isenberg boarded a train for Kingfisher, where he remained until the smoke cleared. He then moved back to Enid and later to California.  


A jury found that Patterson’s death was caused by Williams, and Williams’s death was caused by Patterson as Williams was performing his duty as Marshal. Marshal Williams was survived by a wife and baby.





James Marion Williams - Former Sheriff


Johnston County Sheriff’s Office


James Williams was serving his third term as Johnston County Sheriff when he resigned on July 5, 1920.


For several years very bitter feelings had existed between Williams and local businessman J. W. Phillips, who had been an opponent of Williams in one of his campaigns for Sheriff.


The morning of Wednesday, August 3, 1921, at 10:30 a.m. J. W. Phillips was inside Casey’s Drug Store talking with Deputy Sheriff Alex Watson. About the same time former sheriff James Williams started in the front screen door of the drug store. When Phillips saw Williams, he drew his .44 revolver and started shooting at the unarmed Williams. Williams was shot four times and died within a few minutes.


Phillips was arrested at the scene. After further investigation both Phillips and Deputy Alex Watson were charged with William’s murder.


Phillips was found guilty and sentenced to death however his sentenced was later changed to life in prison by the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals.


 ames Williams was survived by his wife, two daughters and a son.


James Williams is buried in the Tishomingo City Cemetery, Tishomingo, Johnston County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 9N-3-18   NLEOM – 50E7


April 11, 2020




George Williams - Deputy U.S. Marshal


U. S. Marshal

 

Until midnight on November 15, 1907, Oklahoma was under the jurisdiction of the territorial deputy marshals of the Northern District of Indian Territory. 9:00 A.M. on Saturday, November 16, 1907, was the time that President Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed that Oklahoma would become a state.


Since that left a 9 hour period with no one with federal jurisdiction, the U.S. Marshals gave the county sheriffs commissions as special Deputy U.S. Marshals. They also gave the sheriffs several blank special deputy commissions so they could appoint their own men to assist them.


Shortly after 9:00 P.M. on November 16, Deputies George Williams and Fred Keeler entered a “Uno joint” owned by Ernest Lewis, a man who had been in extensive trouble with the law and had several run-ins with Marshal Keeler. Selling “Uno,” although it was a near beer, was illegal to sell. Lewis thought he could circumvent the territorial prohibition on the sale of alcohol since “Uno” contained less that two-percent alcohol.  Lewis was standing at the opposite end of the bar when he saw Williams and Keeler. Pushing his bartender aside, stating there was going to be some shooting and he’d better get out of the way; Lewis pulled his gun and started shooting at the two Marshals. He began firing at the Marshals.  Keeler and Williams being armed returned fire.  Keeler emptied his weapon and stepped outside to reload when Williams walked outside and fell to the ground. He had been shot by Lewis with the bullet entering under his right arm, passing through both lungs and nicking the heart. Lewis was killed by Marshal Keeler moments later.  Marshal Williams was engaged to be married later that week.  Lewis’ widow went on to marry another bad man, Emmett Dalton.





Jim Williams - Posseman, Deputy U. S. Marshal


U. S. Marshal


Deputy Marshals John Swain (Swayne) and Bill (W.H.) Carr were attempting to serve a warrant on a black man named Cornelius Walker, wanted for horse theft, selling whiskey in Indian Territory and murder. On Wednesday, June 5, 1889, Swain and Carr, along with their posseman Jim Williams, traveled to Walker’s home 30 miles from Pauls Valley. At the house Carr went around back while Swain and Williams went in the front.  Williams, carrying a rifle, was the first to enter the house. Two men, Robert and Caesar Franklin, grabbed Williams’ rifle, and wrestle for its control. As the three lawmen were trying to regain control of the situation, Cornelius Walker stepped out from a back room and fired a shot into Williams, hitting him in the left eye killing him instantly. Swain raised his rifle firing at Walker until he fell to the ground. Walker had been shot 13 times and died as he was being transported to Pauls Valley by the deputies.


Revised December 14, 2015 |



John Ellis Williams - Sheriff


Bryan County Sheriff’s Office


John Williams served as the Chief of Police in Durant for four years before he was elected Sheriff of Bryan County.  He was in his second term as Sheriff when, on the night of Friday, November 4, 1938, he was involved in a traffic accident east of Madill.  A truck had run out of gas and had not exhibited any warning flares.  Apparently blinded by the lights of an oncoming vehicle, Williams hit the stalled truck. Chief Williams died instantly from a broken neck. Williams was survived by his second wife Maude and two of his nine children. His wife Maude was appointed Sheriff to serve out the remainder of her husband’s term.




Marvin Gene Williams - Captain


Seminole County Sheriffs Office


About 3 P.M. Sunday afternoon, July 26, 2009, the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office received a call to the Holbert home at 503 N. Second Street in Seminole. Mrs. Holbert advised that her 26 year old son Ezekiel Holbert was in her home, she did not want him there and that there was an arrest warrant out for him for “Domestic Abuse” from an incident in February when he tried to choke her.


Deputy Sheriff “Chase” Whitebird, Captain Williams and a Seminole Lighthorse officer went to the Holbert home. Deputy Whitebird and Captain Williams went to the front door while the Lighthorse officer went to the back door. As Whitebird and Williams started to enter the front door Ezekiel Holbert open fire on them with a 9mm Kel-Tec rifle, striking Whitebird in the face killing him. Williams was shot once in the front right side by Holbert but was able to run from the house. Williams died on the way to the hospital. A female neighbor across the street from the Holbert home was also struck by a bullet but survived. Holbert surrendered to officers about 7 P.M. after a standoff at the house.


Captain Williams had been with the sheriff’s office since 2002 and was survived by his wife, his son Shawn who is also a deputy and three daughters.




Nelson F. Williams - Detective


Tulsa Police Department


Nelson F. Williams, an outstanding officer for the Tulsa Police Department, was the son of a former Chief of Detectives at the Tulsa P.D.  On the night of Sunday, June 1, 1958, Bennie Pink Elliott, 25, was speeding and disregarded a red light at Second and Peoria Avenue. As Williams was taking another detective who had gone off duty, home his patrol car was struck by Elliott’s vehicle in that intersection. Williams was ejected from the car and thrown 60 feet. Williams died from multiple skull fractures the next day on June 2nd. Elliott was charged with speeding, disregarding a stop light and driving under the influence of alcohol and manslaughter.




Waldo A. Williams - Sheriff

Stephens County


Just after midnight on Tuesday, May 13, 1930, Sheriff Williams, Undersheriff Ed Sumrill, Duncan Chief of Police Irvin Gossett, Assistant Chief Charles Coker and Night Policeman W. F. McKinzey had stopped a black Buick that “looked brand new” south bound on Highway 81 about 4 miles north of Duncan. The lawmen were looking for a Buick of this description containing four men wanted in connection with several armed robberies in the area in recent months including one at a service station in Lawton a few hours before.


The men in the Buick were the Cunningham brothers, Forrest “Doc”, 27, John B., 25, Emanuel “Skinney”, 23, and Jess “Jake”, 18. As the officers approached the Buick and it’s occupants were getting out, a gunfight broke out. When it was over Sheriff Williams was wounded in the stomach, chest and leg, and died at 2:30 P.M. that afternoon. Chief Gossett was wounded in the stomach. Forrest Cunningham was dead, John was wounded in the arm and stomach, Emanuel was shot in the spine and paralyzed for life and Jess had escaped.


Jess was captured later in Colorado and all three surviving brothers pled guilty to the Sheriff’s murder and were given life sentences.


Chief Gossett eventually recovered enough to return to work but he was never well and died from the effects of his wound on Saturday, October 7, 1939. Sheriff Williams’ wife Minnie was sworn in on May 15th to complete her husband’s term as Sheriff. Within a year a monument was erected honoring Sheriff Williams and all peace officers near the Y intersection of Highways 81 and 7 (formerly highway 29) near the scene of the shootout.





William Williams - Constable


City of Bismark (Wright City)


Constable Williams and McCurtain County Deputy Sheriff J.J. Flowers and several other possemen were pursuing two men who robbed the local bank. One of the robbers was caught on Saturday, May 6, 1916, and taken to jail in Valliant. After jailing the suspect, the two officers got into an argument over which of them deserved more credit for the arrest. Flowers drew his gun and fired on Williams, killing him. Flowers then rode to his home in Bismark.  The rest of the posse pursued Flowers at his home and, in the ensuing gunfight, Flowers was killed and one posseman was wounded.





Sore Lip Willie - Deputy U.S. Marshal


U. S. Marshal


 Robert Reed and Sore Lip Willie had been appointed Deputy U S Marshals for the limited duty of apprehending a black man named Coffey Barnes for stealing horses. The lawmen located Barnes in the Seminole Nation and when Barnes resisted arrest and he was killed in the shootout. Later on Sunday, October 27, 1889, the lawmen were setting on their horses talking to John Halsey at a gate near his home. As the three were talking, five men were observed riding toward the house. As the five men neared the gate they drew their pistols and opened fire on Reed and Willie, shooting them out of their saddles. The lawmen were dead when they hit the ground. The five men then rode away without saying a word. Halsey recognized the men as Cudge Barnett, Prince Hawkins, Ross Ryley, D. Brown and a man he knew only as Lane. No record can be found indicating if the five men were ever arrested for the murder of the deputies.





Nolan Richard Willis - Detective


MK&T Railroad

  

Just after 8:00 P.M. on Wednesday, July 23, 1930, the body of  Detective Willis was found with one gunshot to the head, and two in the heart. His body was about three blocks north of the Fond du Lac street crossing in the Muskogee railroad yards. His own gun was found next to his body.  His German Shepherd, Queenie, was also laying next to him. Willis had been last seen alive about 15 minutes earlier walking the yard.  Two sets of footprints were found leading away from the crime scene. Half a dozen men were arrested for investigation including two in Parsons, KS, but none of them were charged with the crime and it remained unsolved. Detective Willis was survived by his wife and one daughter.




William Daniel Wilmoth - Constable


White Township


On Wednesday, August 8, 1934, in the Little River community of Oak Hill just north of Idabel, Deputy Sheriff Jasper Whitten and Constable William “Brian” Wilmoth along with Sheriff F.O. “Bud” Stewart entered the home of Mrs. Lecy Rogers in search of the teenage daughter of a local farmer, J. M. Leonard. Sadie, a pretty, slender girl of sixteen, had been missing for three days. Leonard had not seen his daughter since the close of church services on Sunday, August 5.


Leonard told Sheriff Stewart that Sadie had gotten into a car with someone named Paul who was supposed to take her straight home. Paul Jones and Barney Jones, with Jones’ wife and children were reportedly staying at the Rogers place because Barney’s wife had taken ill. Paul never brought Sadie home. When the three officers reached the Rogers home, Ben Rogers, young son of Lecy, was playing in the yard. Ben said the two women were down by the spring washing clothes. Sheriff Stewart went down to the spring to question the women about Paul and Sadie’s whereabouts, while the two deputies went into the house to question Barney. Barney became very nervous when questioned stating he was not aware of their whereabouts. Whitten told him that he would have to come with them for further questioning. Barney pulled a revolver and shot pointblank hitting Whitten in the abdomen. A stunned Wilmoth reach for his six-shooter but was too late. Jones shot Wilmoth in the right leg, in the right side below the shoulder and in the neck. Jones grabbed the young Ben Rogers and made him lead him through the woods. Both Whitten and Wilmoth were taken to a hospital in Paris, Texas where they died from their wounds.  It would be discovered later that Barney Jones and Paul Jones were actually Julius Bohannon and Lee Custer and were not brothers at all. They had robbed a Texas bank before coming to Oklahoma.


Lee Custer and Sadie Leonard had gone to Texas and gotten married and were not aware of the shootings by Bohannon.  They were located in a local motel where Custer was arrested for Bank robbery.


Bohannon was not located and arrested until June 12, 1935, when he tried to reunite with his family. Bohannon was sentenced to 99 years for first degree manslaughter in the case of Constable Wilmoth and to life imprisonment for the murder of Deputy Whitten.




Leslie (Les) Eugene Wilmott - Sergeant


Kiefer Police Department


Sergeant Wilmott, 54, was in charge of training for the Kiefer Police Department as well as Commander of their Reserve Officers Program. Just after midnight the morning of Thursday, May 29, 2008, Sgt. Wilmott was on his way home from a training exercise where he was the instructor and was a couple miles from his home in Oolagah. Sgt. Wilmott was driving north on US Highway 169 when his patrol car ran into the back end of a tractor-trailer at State Highway 88. Sgt. Wilmott died at the scene from his injuries. The driver of the tractor-trailer and his passenger were not injured. Sgt. Wilmott had been in law enforcement for 30 years, serving as Chief of Police of Inola and Beggs before joining the Kiefer Police Department. Sgt. Wilmott was survived by his wife Jerri Anne, their three children Jake, Matt and Robyn and two grandchildren. Son Jake was serving as a Deputy Sheriff with the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office when his father was killed.





Charles B. Wilson - Deputy U.S. Marshal


U.S. Marshal


In 1881, Deputy Wilson worked a case of murder against a Negro man named Jack Crow which may have eventually led to Wilson death.


On August 6, 1884, Wilson commented to his nephew, Edmond Pickens, that some men intended to kill him over a case he had worked.  Wilson stopped at a friend’s home on his way home from a Choctaw election to stay the night. Thursday morning, August 7th, Wilson started home but was approached by a group of men including Bob Burton, James Franklin, Charles Fisher and Jack Crow. He was about 10 miles from home at the time. Burton asked Wilson if he was still a marshal and Wilson responded that he was.  The men then drew their guns and disarmed Wilson. When he was disarmed, Wilson was shot by Burton and fell off his horse. Burton then beat him with the butt of his pistol. Crow walked up and calmly shot Wilson in the back. The men rode off, leaving Wilson to die.


Wilson’s nephew was notified of the killing and headed toward the scene of the murder.  He came upon Abel Harris who had Wilson’s body in a wagon and was heading for the Wilson home.


The U.S. Marshals in Ft. Smith were notified and started in intense investigation.  Interviewing John Slaughter they found out that Crow had told Slaughter that Wilson was going to be killed that day because Wilson had arrested him previously.


On November 20, 1985, a warrant was issued for Jack Crow charging him with murder but eluded arrest for over a year. He was finally arrested on January 2, 1887, Deputy U.S. Marshal Charles Barnhill arrested Crow fifteen miles southwest of Poteau. On September 15, 1887, Judge Isaac Parker presided over the trial of Crow.  The jury found him guilty of murder and Judge Parker sentenced Crow to hang. On April 27, 1888, after appealing his case and loosing, Jack Crow was hanged.




Floyd Wilson - Deputy  U.S. Marshal


U. S. Marshal


Floyd Wilson had been a deputy U.S. Marshal for the Western District of Arkansas out of Ft. Smith for several years.  He was appointed in 1884, in 1889 and again in 1892 when Deputy U.S. Marshal and Detective for the Pacific Express Company, Henry C. Dickey, explained he had a warrant for Henry Starr and asked Wilson if he would help capture Starr.


Henry Starr had been arrested for horse theft in December 1891 and failed to appear in court. He was also suspected of robbing the Nowata Railway Depot of $1,700, followed by more robberies. An additional warrant being issued on November 18, 1892, On Tuesday, December 13, 1892, as they were finishing dinner at the XU Ranch, Arthur Dodge rode up and told them he had just seen Starr riding by.  Wilson and Dickey ran to the corral for their horses. Wilson’s horse was already saddled. He rode off in the direction Starr had gone. Dickey would be several minutes behind Wilson since he had to saddle his horse. Wilson caught up with Starr on Wolf Creek shouting to him, “Hold up, I have a warrant for you.”  Starr stopped his horse, turned back toward Wilson and shouted back to Wilson, “You hold up.”  Wilson announced he was a federal officer and then fired a warning shot over Starr’s head. Starr quickly fired several shots hitting Wilson and knocking him off his horse. Starr then approached Wilson as he was lying on the ground and shot him once more, point blank, in the chest, killing him. When Dickey arrived he found Wilson’s body, noting the powder burns on his coat and five bullet wounds in the lawman. Wilson had been shot in the left hip, right hip, left thigh, left lower leg and once in the chest.


Starr eluded a huge manhunt for the next six months. In July, he was arrested in Colorado and extradited to Ft. Smith where he was tried and found guilty of Wilson’s murder. After several appeals to the U.S. Supreme Court, he pleads guilty to manslaughter and is sentenced to three years. He also received a sentence of seven years for robbery.


He was released in 1903. Five years later, he resumes his life of crime. On February 18, 1921, Henry Starr attempts his last bank robbery in Harrison, Arkansas. He is shot and arrested and died of his gunshot wounds on February 22nd.


Deputy U.S. Marshal Floyd Wilson was returned to Ft. Smith, Arkansas where he is buried.

  




J. C. Wilson - Officer


Weleetka Police Department


About 9 P.M. on Friday, December 30, 1932, J.C. “Dad” Wilson was patrolling his beat as the “extra night man” when he found a broken window in the back of the O.U. Wilcox Grocery. Wilson asked a neighboring businessman to watch the front of the store while he contacted the owner.  As Wilson returned to the store, the other merchant yelled to him that the burglar was trying to escape from the rear of the store. Wilson ran around to the back of the store and confronted a black man, later identified as Henry Yates. As the officer shined his flashlight at Yates, Yates fired several shots at him.  One shot struck Wilson in the heart, killing him nearly instantly.  Two nights later, Henry Yates was arrested by officers in Shawnee. Yates, an ex-convict with multiple arrests for burglary, had just been released on November 12th from his sixth term in the state penitentiary. Yates confessed to the burglary and murder of Wilson. He had taken 56 cents, six packs of cigarettes and a Colt .38 that he sold for $1.50.




James E. Wilson - Deputy Sheriff


Grady County Sheriff’s Office


On Friday, May 31, 1935, Charles Sands and Leon Siler robbed the bank in Elgin. Four days earlier these two men and another man, Ray “Pete” Traxler killed Officer George Loper in Pauls Valley. The men had also taken a family named Medrano hostage at their farmhouse. When the officers saw the farm in the area, they decided to check there for the fugitives.  When Deputy Wilson went to the door he became suspicious because of Mrs. Medrano’s actions. Upon entering the home, Wilson was shot in the chest with a .38 pistol and in the back with a shotgun. Deputy Wilson was able to wound Sands in both legs and one foot before he died.  A group of Oklahoma City Police Officers arrived on the scene but not before three more officers were wounded and Mr. Medrano killed. The Oklahoma City officers charged the house. Sands and Siler were captured. Phyllis Sands, 15 year old wife of Charles Sands and Ruby Herring, 18 year old girlfriend of Siler were also arrested. Traxler was supposed to have assisted with the bank robbery but never showed up.  Sands and Siler were both convicted and electrocuted at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary on June 11, 1937. Ruby and Phyllis were also sentenced to lesser terms in prison.


James “Tete” Wilson was survived by his wife and six children. The statewide depredations of Sands and Siler was one of the case that caused the Oklahoma State Legislature to create the Oklahoma Highway Patrol in August of 1937.





John Thomas Wilson - City Marshal


City of Nowata


James Dyer and Jack Cotton were returning from a cattle drive on Tuesday, February 8, 1898. Shortly after they stabled their horses at McCartney’s Livery stable, Dyer had become drunk and started arguing with a local farmer, William Dilley, about the ownership of a halter. With the argument becoming more violent, someone sent for Marshal Wilson. When Wilson arrived and entered the stable, Dyer opened fire on him shooting him in the chest below the heart. Wilson returned fire, even though he was mortally wounded, hitting Dyer four times. Wilson was able to stumble across the street before he collapsed and died. Dyer went to a nearby drug store and died within ten minutes.




Joseph S. Wilson - Deputy U.S. Marshal


U. S. Marshal


On Tuesday, September 22, 1891, Deputy Marshal Wilson asked a man by the name of John Carey, to guide him to the home of Big Alec who lived about ten miles from Tahlequah on 14 Mile Creek. Deputy Wilson had a warrant for the arrest of Sam Downing. Wilson told Carey he would not have to participate in the arrest of Downing, who was using the name of Sam Hickory, only help him find the house.  Once the arrest was made, Wilson told Carey he would fire one shot letting him know the arrest was successful.  Carey led Wilson to the property owned by Big Alec then retreated to wait for the arrest to be made.


Wilson found Hickory hitching up a team of horses. He told Hickory of the warrant. Hickory stated he would go with the lawman but first needed to unhitch his team, saddle a horse and then advise Big Alec at a nearby fishing stream. After unhitching the team, Wilson and Henry walked to the house and as Hickory entered Wilson fired off one shot to announce the successful arrest to Carey.  Hickory grabbed a gun and shot Wilson in the side. The bullet passed through his chest puncturing a lung. Both men exchanged gunfire before Wilson staggered to his horse. He was too weak and unable to mount the horse and fell to the ground. Carey hearing more gunshots than planned left the area.


Wilson lived through the night and was found the next day still alive by Hickory and Tom Shade. They struck him in the head several times with a piece of wood and an axe. After dragging his body by the neck to a ravine they buried him but not before they stripped him of his hat, coat, pistol and gun belt. They also took his saddle and bridle.  Carey reported the gunshots and a massive search was started for Wilson. Several days later, Shade and Big Alec turned themselves in but Hickory was nowhere to be found. Wilson’s body was found on Saturday, brought to Tahlequah, examined and then buried. Hickory was finally arrested in the Osage Nation and returned to Ft. Smith to await trial. Hickory was found guilty of murder and sentenced to hang. In 1894, after two appeals, a third trial was about to begin when Hickory pled guilty to manslaughter and sentenced to five years and one day in the Columbus, Ohio prison. Tom Shade was acquitted.




Weldon N. Wilson - Officer


Wetumka Police Department


Officer Wilson, 22, and Hughes County Deputy Sheriff Mitchell Compier were conducting undercover prohibition investigations when on April 10, 1926, they made a whiskey purchase from Roswell Hamilton, 30. The officers arrested Hamilton as soon as he sold them the whiskey and took a .38 pistol off of him. The officers were transporting Hamilton to jail by car with Deputy Compier driving, Hamilton in the passenger’s seat and Officer Wilson standing on the right side running board. Hamilton later related that Wilson had been poking him in the side with his gun trying to get Hamilton to tell where he got the whiskey they bought. Following one of the pokes Hamilton brushed the gun away and it accidentally went off twice. One bullet struck Hamilton in the arm and the other struck Compier. Hamilton then took the gun away from Wilson and shot him twice fatally. Hamilton then shot Compier to death before he could draw his weapon.




William Wiley Obediah Wilson - Deputy Sheriff


Cherokee County Sheriffs Office


Late the evening of Wednesday, September 6, 1922, Deputy Wilson, 56, was called to a drunken disturbance at the Wauhillau Club, twelve miles south of Tahlequah. Upon his arrival Deputy Wilson arrested a full blood Cherokee Indian named Joe Groundhog for causing the disturbance and started toward Tahlequah on horseback with his prisoner. It was now shortly after midnight and they were going to pass by Groundhog’s home. Groundhog asked the deputy if he would stop and let him get some clothes which the deputy allowed. The deputy followed Groundhog into his house where he was attacked and clubbed to death by his prisoner. Joe Groundhog was arrested for the murder of Deputy Wilson, convicted of first degree manslaughter and sentenced to forty-five years in prison. Deputy Wilson was survived by his wife of thirty-two years and two adult sons.




Ira Eugene Wofford - Undersheriff


Sequoyah County Sheriff’s Office


On Friday, December 4,1953, Undersheriff Wofford and Oklahoma State Crime Bureau Agent Leonard Farris were transporting a prisoner, Frank Trotter, from Denver, Colorado back to Oklahoma where he was wanted for burglarizing a service station in Sallisaw. East of Byers, Colorado their vehicle hit an icy spot, went off the road and rolled over several times.  Wofford and Farris were ejected and the car rolled on top of them, pinning both officers. Trotter, still handcuffed, crawled out of the wreckage and attempted to lift the car off of the officers.  Failing at his attempt, he covered the officers with a blanket from the car and proceeded to flag down a passing motorist and asked them to summon help. Undersheriff Wofford died from his injuries before an ambulance could arrive.  Just before he died, Wofford thanked Frank Trotter for trying to help him and asked another officer to remove Trotter’s handcuffs.





Leslie Clarence Wolfinbarger - Night City Marshal


City of Collinsville  


About 3 A.M. on Friday, May 28, 1915, Wolfinbarger, 30, was escorting two brothers home who were drunk. As they were walking down Main Street, the two brothers attacked Wolfinbarger with a hidden knife, slashing his throat severing his jugular vein.  Witnesses to the murder included several people in a near by café and his wife and daughter from their apartment window across the street. The two brothers were arrested at the scene and charged with the marshal’s murder. This was to have been Wolfinbarger’s last night as an officer. He had told his family before he went to work that night that he did not want to be “forceful” on his last night to work.




Joseph W. Wood  - Constable  


Oklahoma County

Justice of the Peace Court


About 4:30 A.M. the morning of Sunday, July 14, 1935, several Constables were keeping the peace at a crowded dance in a night club on the State Fairgrounds near NE 10th and Eastern when two men got in a fight. One of the men, Arthur Huff, 23, was arrested for carrying a gun by Constable J. A. Gibson. Once outside Huff’s girlfriend asked to speak with him, which Gibson allowed. Suddenly Huff and his girlfriend rushed Gibson and Huff pulled Gibson’s gun from it’s holster. The other Constables ran to help Gibson get back control of his gun. As Constable Wood, 49, got to the two men Huff shot him in the stomach and he died. Huff was arrested and charged with murder. It was soon learned that Huff was an escapee from a Missouri prison. On September 18th Huff escaped from the Oklahoma County jail along with five other men. Six months later Huff was arrested in Dayton, Ohio and brought back to Oklahoma. Huff was tried, found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to twenty-five years in prison. Wood had only been a Constable for six months for Justice of the Peace Jack C. Whaler and had planned to start a two week vacation the day he was killed. He was survived by his wife, a son and a daughter.




Dwight Calvin Woodrell Jr. - Sheriff


Pawnee County Sheriff's Office


About 3:45 A.M. Saturday, October 13, 2001, Sheriff Woodrell radioed his dispatcher that he was out with a “Robert Weller” behind the “old Spess Oil Building” 1 ½ miles west of Cleveland on Highway 64 and requested a couple deputies to back him up. A short time later deputies were not able to get a radio response from Sheriff Woodrell. Sheriff Woodrell was located a few minutes later lying in the front seat of his patrol car, shot several times. Woodrell was transported by ambulance to the Cleveland Hospital where he died at 4:40 A.M. It appeared Woodrell had interrupted a burglary at the business when he was shot. Sheriff Woodrell was survived by his wife Karen, three young sons and a daughter. In February of 2004, James C Taylor and Justin L Walker were charged with Woodrell’s murder. Both suspects were already in the State Penitentiary serving sentences for other crimes when the charges were filed.





Frederick M. Woods - Deputy Constable


City of Eufaula


The summer of 1908 was a summer of unrest in McIntosh County.  A dispute between the town of Checotah and Eufaula over which would become the county seat turned into a deadly one.  On Sunday, June 7, 1908, a dozen armed men from Checotah, including County Clerk, Ed Julian, got off a train in Eufaula. The men marched over to the County Courthouse to remove county records from the building intending to forcibly establish the county seat at Checotah. City officers arrived on the scene and tried to disarm the Checotah contingent and restore order. When Deputy Constable Woods tried to disarm Joe Parmenter, he shot Woods in the left chest. After Woods fell to the ground, Parmenter shot him twice more, hitting him once in the thigh, the slug traveling through his bowels and lodging in his backbone.  Special Deputy Kilgore then shot Parmenter twice, wounding him in the hand and side. The remainder of the Checotah men then surrendered their weapons. Parmenter recovered from his wounds, but Constable Woods died the next evening on June 8th.


OLEM – 3S-2-1  NLEOM – 12E25





Riley Woods, Posse, Deputy U.S. Marshal


U. S. Marshal Service


Riley Woods, 22, was one of eleven people killed and as many as nineteen wounded on Monday, April 15, 1872, at the Whitmire Schoolhouse east of Tahlequah, near the modern town of Christie in Adair County in the Going Snake District of the Cherokee Nation.  


Zeke Proctor was being tried by the Cherokee Nation at the schoolhouse for accidentally killing a widow named Polly Beck Hildebrand.  The relatives of Polly convinced the federal court at Fort Smith to intervene in the case. The U.S. Commissioner issued an arrest warrant for Zeke Proctor on a charge of “assault with intent to kill” to Deputy U.S. Marshals Jacob G. Owens and Joseph S. Peavey. The Deputy Marshals led a deputized posse including friends and relatives of Polly Beck Hildebrand to the schoolhouse. As the federal posse entered the schoolhouse a massive gun battle erupted.  Posse members Jesse “Black Sut” Beck, Samuel Beck, William Hicks, George Selvidge, James Ward, and Riley Woods were shot and killed that day. Deputy U.S. Marshal Jacob Owens and Posse William Beck were also wounded and died the next day, April 16th from their gunshot wounds.

Riley Woods is buried in Whitmire Cemetery, Christie, Adair County, Oklahoma.


OLEM – 10S-1-12    NLEOM – 12E14


April 15, 2022




James A. Woolley - Detective


Tulsa Police Department


At 7 P.M. on Wednesday, January 21, 1931, Officer E.A. Humphrey called for assistance to help him investigate three men sitting in a car with half a dozen shotguns and a number of tires.  Humphrey figured these items were stolen. Detectives William Walkley and James Woolley responded. The officers arrested William Elm at a nearby address and then approached the car to question the others. As the officers approached the car, the driver drew a gun and shot Woolley in the chest.  Woolley was able to fire four shots before he collapsed.  The bullet had pierced one lung, lodging near his spine.  Woolley, 62, died from his wounds on January 23rd. He was survived by his wife, Texana, two daughters and one son. Woolley had served as Tulsa County Commissioner for two terms and Tulsa County Sheriff prior to his joining the Tulsa Police Department.  Charles Elm was arrested the next day in Siloam Springs, Arkansas. Gene Elm, the killer of Woolley, was later arrested in St. Paul, Minnesota, returned to Tulsa for trial, convicted and sentenced to life in prison.





Winfield Scott Wooten - Special Agent


Missouri, Kansa & Texas (MK&T) Railroad Police


On the night of Sunday, March 16, 1941, MK&T Railroad agent W.S. Wooten was pursuing two black men when they crashed their vehicle at Lansing and Independence Street. Wooten managed to arrest the two men with the help of two black Tulsa Police Officers. The officers asked Wooten if he needed further assistance to which he declined. Wooten did ask them if they would contact headquarters and ask a Raiding Squad be sent. The officers called headquarters and then left to answer another call. Several Raiding Squad officers including L.R. “Shorty” Rogers were dispatched.


Witnesses stated they saw Wooten arguing with one of the suspects after the black officers left and before the Raiding Squad officers arrived. One of the suspects, Finis Benningfield, tried to walk away, and when Wooten tried to stop him, Benningfield managed to get Wooten’s weapon and forced Wooten to get in the car. Benningfield then shot Agent Wooten, emptying the weapon, and killing him.


When the Raiding Squad officers arrived, the driver pulled in front of Wooten’s car, Officer Rogers got out and approached the car from an angle that prevented him from seeing the dead agent’s body. Benningfield, seated in the car, shot Rogers once in the head as he approached, killing him almost instantly. Two other officers stepped from their car and shot Benningfield six times, fatally wounding him.


Winfield Wooten was buried in small cemetery in Benbrook, Texas, a suburb of Fort Worth. He was survived by his wife and a step-son.


OLEM – 7N-3-2    NLEOM – 62W27


|Sept 15, 2018




James Work - Deputy Sheriff


Muskogee County Sheriff’s Office


On, Thursday, May 4, 1911, Muskogee County Deputy Sheriffs Jim Work and J. B. “Bud” Robertson were trying to arrest Bob Davis in Porum, OK, for cattle theft. A grand jury had indicted Davis on these charges. His friend, Leonard McCullough, had perjured himself during the grand jury hearings trying to help Davis.  As the officers approached the Davis home, they encountered Bob Davis, his brother, Amos and McCullough. The officers ordered the men to surrender. They did not. They in turn ran toward the house then to the barn where a gunfight broke out. Deputy Work was shot once in the heart and then twice more after he fell to the ground. The Davis brothers and McCullough escaped while Robertson was trying to assist his fallen partner.  The Davis’s and their companions were well known thieves of livestock and several murders had resulted from their work over the years. Bob and Amos Davis were captured in Denver, CO, and returned to Porum on Sunday, May 14, 1911. McCullough was also charged with the murder but he escaped.





W. A. Worley - Deputy Sheriff


Stephens County Sheriff’s Office


On the night of Monday, July 25, 1921, Stephens County Sheriff E. H. Rhyne and Deputy Sheriff W.A. “Dick” Worley were summoned to an oil camp just north of Oil City.  The groceryman in the oil camp had denied credit to a man named Tom Rippy (or Rippey). Becoming incensed, Rippy began shooting up the camp.  When the two officers approached Rippy, he ran into a patch of weeds and opened fire striking Deputy Sheriff Worley fatally. Sheriff Rhyne shot six times at Rippy hitting him five. Both Worley and Rippy died at the scene. Worley’s obituary stated he was from Pauls Valley and had been in law enforcement for almost four decades. The report also stated that he had been a U.S. Marshal in territorial times, a Deputy U.S. Marshal and a County Jailer after that service and had been serving as a deputy sheriff at the time of his death.

 



Glenn Truman Wortham, Auxiliary Officer


Tulsa Police Department


Glenn Wortham, 45, had been working for 28 years as the plant operations manager for the Erle M. Jorgensen Company. He had also been working as an Auxiliary Police Officer for the Tulsa Police Department for two and one-half years. The Tulsa Police Department used uncompensated volunteer auxiliary officers as part of the city’s civil defense program.  Just after midnight on Sunday, July 15, 1973, Wortham was riding with Officer Mitch Criner when they received a call to investigate a stabbing at DJ’s Charburger Grill.  During the investigation, they arrested Glen Edward Stewart as the suspect after chasing him on foot for two blocks. The officers took Stewart to Hillcrest Medical Center to treat him for a cut on his hand. At that point, Stewart became violent.  As the two officers tried to lift him from his cot, Stewart kicked Officer Wortham in the stomach. The struggle caused him to suffer a heart attack.  Wortham collapsed and died in the emergency room.




Edward Jason Wright – Deputy Sheriff

Logan County Sheriff’s Office


About 9:45 p.m. Thursday evening, October 20, 2016, Deputy Wright, 33, was transporting a man to a hotel in Guthrie. Earlier in his shift Deputy Wright had taken the man into custody for a mental evaluation after the man had burned his own residence down. The man was transported to the Crisis Center in Oklahoma City where it was determined that the man did not fit the criteria for treatment. Deputy Wright then started back to Guthrie with the man to find him a hotel room. Deputy Wright was driving down Division Street when he suffered a heart attack. Riding with Deputy Wright was off duty Reserve Deputy Fleetwood who was able to bring the patrol vehicle to a safe stop and call for help. Two Guthrie police officers arrived first and began giving CPR to Deputy Wright. Deputy Wright was transported to the Logan Mercy Hospital. At 11 p.m. Deputy Wright was transferred to a heart hospital in Oklahoma City where he died Sunday, October 23rd. Deputy Wright was survived by his wife Lindsay and four children.


OLEM – 4N-1-16                NLEOM -